• 3 minutes Boris Johnson taken decision about 5G Huawei ban by delay (fait accompli method)
  • 6 minutes This Battery Uses Up CO2 to Create Energy
  • 10 minutes Phase One trade deal, for China it is all about technology war
  • 12 minutes Trump has changed into a World Leader
  • 3 hours We're freezing! Isn't it great? The carbon tax must be working!
  • 6 hours Indonesia Stands Up to China. Will Japan Help?
  • 3 hours US (provocations and tech containment) and Chinese ( restraint and long game) strategies in hegemony conflict
  • 10 hours Shale Oil Fiasco
  • 24 hours Might be Time for NG Producers to Find New Career
  • 11 hours Environmentalists demand oil and gas companies *IN THE USA AND CANADA* reduce emissions to address climate change
  • 3 hours Historian Slams Greta. I Don't See Her in Beijing or Delhi.
  • 7 hours Tesla Will ‘Disappear’ Or ‘Lose 80%’ Of Its Value
  • 17 hours Beijing Must Face Reality That Taiwan is Independent
  • 1 day Angela Merkel take notice. Russia cut off Belarus oil supply because they would not do as Russia demanded
  • 21 hours Anti-Macron Protesters Cut Power Lines, Oil Refineries Already Joined Transport Workers as France Anti-Macron Strikes Hit France Hard
  • 1 day China's Economy and Subsequent Energy Demand To Decelerate Sharply Through 2024
John Daly

John Daly

Dr. John C.K. Daly is the chief analyst for Oilprice.com, Dr. Daly received his Ph.D. in 1986 from the School of Slavonic and East European…

More Info

Keystone XL pipeline - investor's dream or brewing nightmare

Keystone XL pipeline - investor's dream or brewing nightmare

A year ago, the 1,700-mile, $7 billion Keystone XL pipeline, designed to export Alberta's oil sands oil to U.S. refineries on the Gulf of Mexico, seemed a slam dunk.

Approval of the Keystone XL pipeline is critical for TransCanada and the Canadian energy industry. If constructed, the three foot wide pipeline would transmit 700,000 barrels a day of hot, heavy, high-pollutant and corrosive oil sands tar bitumen from northern Alberta across the central U.S. to refineries near Houston and Port Arthur in Texas and facilities in Louisiana via a conduit whose walls would be ½ an inch thick.

But what seemed a done deal up to a few months ago is no more, and investors seeking the next safe project should look elsewhere.

Environmentalists have been up in arms against the project since its inception, with more than 1,000 demonstrators being arrested in Washington's Lafayette Square across from the White House in recent weeks, an event that has received virtually no attention from the mainstream U.S. media. Quite aside from the issue of the tar sands having a higher carbon footprint than traditional oil sources, environmentalists are concerned that leaks from the pipeline could pollute the Oglala aquifer, the water source for America's breadbasket. A further concern came when Trans-Canada applied for a waiver to run oil through the pipeline at pressures higher than those now used on oil pipelines in the U.S., resulting in a lower margin of safety, which the company…




Oilprice - The No. 1 Source for Oil & Energy News