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Martin Tillier

Martin Tillier

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Investing In The Nuclear Renaissance

Since the election in November energy stocks have soared, with most of the attention being on conventional oil and gas producers. That makes sense, but traders and investors should not ignore the renaissance currently underway in another energy industry, nuclear power.

The conventional wisdom about the energy sector under a Trump Presidency is well known, and perfectly logical. Fossil fuels are back. Some of the campaign rhetoric that led to that belief, of course, is just that, words with no practical impact. There is a limit to what a President can do and bringing back coal jobs, a feat that would require changing global attitudes and economic realities, is beyond those limits. Some stated energy policies, however, are more achievable. The White House controls the Department of Energy and the EPA, so changing the regulatory environment to favor fossil fuels is fairly easily done. When Rick Perry was confirmed as Energy Secretary it looked to many people as just further confirmation that oil was the place to be.

On the surface that makes sense; Perry was the Governor of Texas, after all, which is rightly seen as an oil State. Dig a bit deeper into his record, however, and it becomes clear that Perry’s energy policy for Texas was more a matter of “all of the above”. He certainly created a favorable environment for oil and gas, but under his watch, Texas also became a leader in solar and wind power generation, indicating a practical approach above…

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