• 3 minutes CoV-19: China, WHO, myth vs fact
  • 6 minutes Trump reinvented tariffs and it worked
  • 9 minutes IEA Sees First Global Oil Demand Drop in a Decade on Coronavirus
  • 12 minutes Question: Why are oil futures so low through 2020?
  • 2 days "For the Public's Interest"
  • 1 hour Is Pete Buttigieg emerging as the most likely challenger to Trump?
  • 1 hour Don't sneeze. Coronavirus is a threat to oil markets and global economies
  • 17 hours Natural Gas from Cow Poop Used to Save the Environment and Help Farmers
  • 1 day Coronovairus, Phase One Agreement, Lower for Longer
  • 30 mins The New Class War Exposes the Oligarchs and Enablers
  • 1 hour Foxconn cancelled the reopening of their mfg plants scheduled for tomorrow. Rescheduled to March 3rd. . . . if they're lucky.
  • 1 day Weekly U.S. Imports of Crude Oil. No, the U.S. is NOT oil & gas self-sufficient.
  • 11 hours Has Trump put the USA at the service of Israel?
  • 15 hours Is cheaper plastics feedstock on the horizon?
  • 2 days Cheap natural gas is making it very hard to go green
  • 9 hours Solar Cells at 25 Cents Apiece (5 cents per watt)

Ignore The Words Of The Politicians: Buy Solar

Solar

Drawing conclusions about trading and investing based on the words of any politician is a dangerous game at the best of times, and the evidence so far suggests that that is even more the case when it comes to President Trump. He is, as businessmen usually are, a pragmatist at heart. The lack of a politician’s clear ideology makes him react to each situation as he sees fit, regardless of what he said or did in the past. Now you may see that as a good thing or a bad thing, but the one thing that it undeniably is is confusing. So, if the President’s words essentially mean nothing, where is a poor trader to look for inspiration?

A much better guide as to policy can be divined by looking at the record of his appointees, and from that perspective one of the assumptions about Trump’s energy policy looks to be mistaken. Candidate Trump’s strong support of fossil fuels, with talk of revitalizing the coal industry and releasing America’s resources of oil and gas, naturally led to the assumption that the alternative energy sector, solar and wind power in particular, would suffer under his administration. To many the appointment of Rick Perry, former Governor of oil rich Texas, as Energy Secretary confirmed that view.

If we look at Perry’s actual record in Texas, though, that assumption looks erroneous. Sure, he did whatever he could to facilitate oil and gas extraction, minimizing regulations and restrictions at the state level. What many…




Oilprice - The No. 1 Source for Oil & Energy News