• 6 minutes Trump vs. MbS
  • 11 minutes Can the World Survive without Saudi Oil?
  • 15 minutes WTI @ $75.75, headed for $64 - 67
  • 16 hours Satellite Moons to Replace Streetlamps?!
  • 1 day US top CEO's are spending their own money on the midterm elections
  • 10 hours EU to Splash Billions on Battery Factories
  • 14 hours U.S. Shale Oil Debt: Deep the Denial
  • 22 hours The Balkans Are Coming Apart at the Seams Again
  • 6 hours Owning stocks long-term low risk?
  • 9 hours The Dirt on Clean Electric Cars
  • 2 days OPEC Is Struggling To Deliver On Increased Output Pledge
  • 1 day Uber IPO Proposals Value Company at $120 Billion
  • 23 hours 47 Oil & Gas Projects Expected to Start in SE Asia between 2018 & 2025
  • 1 day A $2 Trillion Saudi Aramco IPO Keeps Getting Less Realistic
  • 2 days U.N. About Climate Change: World Must Take 'Unprecedented' Steps To Avert Worst Effects
  • 5 hours The end of "King Coal" in the Wales
Alt Text

Why Crypto Miners Are Paying Attention To The Permian

The Permian is literally burning…

Alt Text

Oil Markets Take A Bearish Turn

Oil markets appear to have…

James Stafford

James Stafford

James Stafford is the Editor of Oilprice.com

More Info

Trending Discussions

Hooking up the Grid: Power Ships and Floating Nuclear Plants

How do you overcome chronic power shortages in developing countries or in remote areas? “Power ships” and floating nuclear platforms.

First, we’ve got a massive new Turkish-owned vessel docked 100 meters off the coast of Beirut and hooked up to Lebanon’s electricity grid, delivering 188 megawatts of electricity daily. A second Turkish ship is scheduled to arrive in Lebanon in August, which should bump it to 270 megawatts daily.

Second, we’ve got a much bigger endeavor—Russia’s plans for floating nuclear reactors to dock in the remote Arctic. This floating nuclear power plant—the first ever in the world--will have two 35-megawatt generators that will be able to supply power to remote Arctic communities directly from the ship. It’s the Akademik Lomonosov, and it’s slated for completion by 2016. Once it’s finished, the Russians—courtesy of Rosatom State Nuclear Energy Corporation--plan to build 4-6 more. The Akademik Lomonosov differs from the Turkish vessels in that it is not self-propelled; rather it must be towed to its destination.

The Akademik Lomonosov is an autonomous power facility, manufactured as non-self-propelled vessel. It is 140m long, 30m wide and 10m high. It has a draught of 5.56m. Its displacement is 21,500t with a crew of 70 people.

Once it’s docked, it will be able to provide electric power through two light-water reactors, heat, and fresh water through a…

To read the full article

Please sign up and become a premium OilPrice.com member to gain access to read the full article.

RegisterLogin

Trending Discussions





Oilprice - The No. 1 Source for Oil & Energy News