• 3 minutes Trump vs. MbS
  • 11 minutes Can the World Survive without Saudi Oil?
  • 19 minutes Saudis Threaten Retaliation If Sanctions are Imposed
  • 51 mins WTI @ $75.75, headed for $64 - 67
  • 52 mins EU to Splash Billions on Battery Factories
  • 3 hours US top CEO's are spending their own money on the midterm elections
  • 17 mins The Dirt on Clean Electric Cars
  • 11 hours Petrol versus EV
  • 5 hours OPEC Is Struggling To Deliver On Increased Output Pledge
  • 6 mins Satellite Moons to Replace Streetlamps?!
  • 3 hours The Balkans Are Coming Apart at the Seams Again
  • 8 hours 10 Incredible Facts about U.S. LNG
  • 48 mins Uber IPO Proposals Value Company at $120 Billion
  • 16 hours E-mopeds
  • 3 hours A $2 Trillion Saudi Aramco IPO Keeps Getting Less Realistic
  • 6 hours U.N. About Climate Change: World Must Take 'Unprecedented' Steps To Avert Worst Effects
  • 1 day These are the world’s most competitive economies: US No. 1
Alt Text

China Turns Its Back On U.S. Oil

As the ongoing trade war…

Alt Text

Carbon Pricing Won't Kill Big Oil

Big oil has agreed to…

John Daly

John Daly

Dr. John C.K. Daly is the chief analyst for Oilprice.com, Dr. Daly received his Ph.D. in 1986 from the School of Slavonic and East European…

More Info

Trending Discussions

Brazilian Offshore Fields - Caveat Emptor

A decade ago Jim O'Neill, then Goldman Sachs head of global economic research and commodities and strategy research, coined an acronym that has increasingly come to dominate the last decade in a study reported entitled, "Building Better Global Economic BRICs." Despite the coy cuteness of the title, the paper's content was both serious and prescient, predicting the rise of the four BRIC economies - Brazil, Russia, India and China - over the next few years.

O'Neill's forecast has come to pass, but what is interesting about the rise of the BRIC economies is that only Russia is a major energy exporter, vying with Saudi Arabia for the world's number one position. Both India and China have to purchase expensive energy imports to fuel their economies, which leaves Brazil as the median state - since the beginning of the year, it has been a modest net energy exporter, greatly pleasing Brazil's government and treasury.

While Brazil is seemingly poised for not only soaring economic growth, its energy sector is about to boom as well, and herein lies a cautionary tale, nor for individual investors, but for those seemingly invulnerable economic colossi, the multinational oil companies.

As oil is the world's most fungible commodity oil companies have unprecedented economic clout and political support that it buys in most countries and they usually use that massive influence to improve their bottom lines regardless of the lopsided deals that they forge with resource-rich…

To read the full article

Please sign up and become a premium OilPrice.com member to gain access to read the full article.

RegisterLogin

Trending Discussions





Oilprice - The No. 1 Source for Oil & Energy News