• 5 minutes Rage Without Proof: Maduro Accuses U.S. Official Of Plotting Venezuela Invasion
  • 8 minutes What Can Bring Oil Down to $20?
  • 14 minutes Paris Is Burning Over Climate Change Taxes -- Is America Next?
  • 3 hours Alberta govt to construct another WCS processing refinery
  • 1 hour Let's Just Block the Sun, Shall We?
  • 4 hours Venezuela continues to sink in misery
  • 2 hours Instead Of A Withdrawal, An Initiative: Iran Hopes To Agree With Russia And Turkey on Syrian Constitution Forum
  • 20 hours U.S. Senate Advances Resolution To End Military Support For Saudis In Yemen
  • 2 days OPEC Cuts Deep to Save Cartel
  • 23 hours Quebecans Snub Noses at Alberta's Oil but Buy More Gasoline
  • 2 days $867 billion farm bill passed
  • 15 hours Regular Gas dropped to $2.21 per gallon today
  • 2 days Contradictory: Euro Zone Takes Step To Deeper Integration, Key Issues Unresolved
  • 2 days WTO So Set Up Panels To Rule On U.S. Tariff Disputes
  • 2 days IEA Sees Global Oil Supply Tightening More Quickly In 2019
  • 2 days Global Economy-Bad Days Are coming
Alt Text

Qatar’s OPEC Exit May Just Be The Beginning

Qatar shocked markets yesterday with…

Alt Text

Libya’s NOC Won’t Pay ‘Ransom’ For Biggest Oil Field

Libya’s National Oil Corporation said…

Irina Slav

Irina Slav

Irina is a writer for the U.S.-based Divergente LLC consulting firm with over a decade of experience writing on the oil and gas industry.

More Info

Trending Discussions

Australians Create Battery From Waste

Wherever you look these days there’s talk about batteries. Cheaper batteries, solid state batteries, recycled batteries, it’s breakthrough after breakthrough, it seems. Few of these, however, see the light of commercial production day. But the latest news in this segment of media streams combines recycling and low costs.

Lithium Australia, a company whose stated ambition is to close the cycle from mine to battery recycling and put waste to good use, last week announced a world-first: a lithium-ion battery made entirely from mining waste. It had used a proprietary waste processing technique that, the company said, removed the need for including high-purity lithium hydroxide or lithium carbonate from the battery, using instead tri-lithium phosphate, which substantially reduced the production cost of the battery.

The report is bound to garner attention: the cost of batteries is the main obstacle to mass EV adoption, seems to be the general opinion among experts in the field. Of course, another would be reliability. Lithium Australia has not elaborated on this aspect of its battery, but this may be simply because it’s too early to talk about reliability. The fact that a battery was made from waste is significant enough, though only potentially at this stage. However, the company did report that its battery performed on par with the industry standard that uses lithium carbonate, which is certainly promising.

The world has abundant supply of lithium, which has made some observers question the hype around the metal and its soaring price as EVs moved closer to the mainstream. Lithium is indeed far from a shortage as a flurry of new projects come on stream. In fact, its price is seen peaking this year before it rebounds after 2021 as supply catches up with soaring demand. Why, then, with so much supply, bother with waste? Related: The Biggest Threat To Australia’s LNG Sector

The answer, of course, is because of prices. Market research firm Roskill recently said in a report that the share of lithium hydroxide used in batteries will increase from 25 percent at present to 55 percent by 2027. But lithium hydroxide is costlier than the tri-lithium phosphate that Lithium Australia says it had successfully used in a battery. As the demand for batteries grows—and it will grow in leaps and bounds, surveys suggest—the rush for ever-cheaper batteries will intensify. This is where the significance of the Lithium Australia battery could turn from potential into real.

Meanwhile, there has been news on the battery recycling front as well. Battery recycling is also attracting more attention now as we gradually wake up to the fact all these batteries in everything, not just cars, don’t last forever. But they can be used to make other batteries: a consortium including Ford and GM recently announced an extension to a project that focuses on a battery recycling process that transforms dead lithium-ion batteries into new cathode materials, to be used in car batteries again. According to the consortium, the material contributes to lower costs and higher energy density for the new batteries.

There is a veritable race for better, cheaper, and more reliable batteries. News will continue coming in from this direction, and if recycling efforts intensify to catch up with the other innovation paths, the future would look pretty bright on the battery front.

By Irina Slav for Oilprice.com

More Top Reads From Oilprice.com:




Back to homepage

Trending Discussions


Leave a comment
  • Steve on December 03 2018 said:
    The US navy has also found a way to convert seawater to jet fuel at 3 to 6 dollars per gallon and it would be carbon neutral when burned. You wouldn't have to change the entire hydrocarbon infrastructure. But the problem is that you may have to put more energy (ie nuclear reactor) into the process of making the jet fuel than the energy you get out. This is the problem with creating batteries out of waste. You would still need to use energy for the process (heat from hydrocarbons, etc.) of converting waste to lithium ion batteries and it may not make sense for energy return on energy invested. This is the major problem with intermittent sources (no such thing as renewable) of energy and battery storage that do nothing but exacerbate energy usage!
  • Brett on December 04 2018 said:
    demand for oil increases into the 2060s along with population; Australia is surely the place to maximize solar power, recyclable batteries without relying on exotic materials is priority one - I'm of the school that says we need all power sources to deal with a world population that will peak (around 2060) at something like eleven billion. for instance it makes great sense to reuse aluminum but not glass; recycled plastics are a dubious effort from a strict energy use standpoint but having them float about in the oceans adds an environmental incentive. stories like this one are encouraging!

Leave a comment




Oilprice - The No. 1 Source for Oil & Energy News