• 4 minutes Is $60/Bbl WTI still considered a break even for Shale Oil
  • 7 minutes Oil Price Editorial: Beware Of Saudi Oil Tanker Sabotage Stories
  • 11 minutes Mueller Report Brings Into Focus Obama's Attempted Coup Against Trump
  • 15 minutes Wonders of Shale- Gas,bringing investments and jobs to the US
  • 8 hours Adsorbent natural gas tanks are revolutionary.
  • 2 hours Visualizing How Much Oil Is In An Electric Vehicle (Hint: a heckuva lot)
  • 7 hours Apartheid Is Still There: Post-apartheid South Africa Is World’s Most Unequal Country
  • 8 hours Evil Awakens: Fascist Symbols And Rhetoric On Rise In Italian EU Vote
  • 36 mins Total nonsense in climate debate
  • 10 hours IMO2020 To scrub or not to scrub
  • 4 hours Theresa May to Step Down
  • 23 hours Look at the LONGER TERM bigger picture of international oil & gas. Ignore temporary hiccups.
  • 16 hours IMO 2020 could create fierce competition for scarce water resources
  • 1 day Apple Boycott in China
  • 1 day IRAN makes threats, rattles sabre . . . . U.S. makes threats, rattles sabre . . . . IRAQ steps up and plays the mediator. THIS ALLOWS BOTH SIDES TO "SAVE FACE". Then serious negotiations start.
  • 1 day Australian Voters Reject 'Climate Change' Politicians
  • 4 hours BBC: Proposal to spend 25% of EU budget on climate change
  • 1 min Some Good News on Climate Change Maybe

Time To Dip A Toe Back Into The Ocean

Investors are generally better off paying little attention to weekly oil inventory and production figures. They can cause an immediate reaction in the oil markets, but can often send false signals. In addition, the implications of a weekly number are, by their very nature, short term. Over the last couple of weeks though, the numbers released by the IEA, and this week's report in particular, offer some encouraging news for energy investors.

Inventories climbed, for sure, and that marks the 15th consecutive week that inventories have remained above the eighty year high, which puts the current supply level into perspective. The rise, however, was less than expected and the production increase dipped below the short term moving average. Add to that strong demand, particularly for gasoline which was up over 4 percent year on year, and it hints that the worst may be over. That conclusion is certainly supported by the gradual recovery in oil prices.

That doesn’t mean, however, that caution should be thrown to the wind. There are some opportunities in Exploration and Production (E&P) companies, but bad news, of production cuts and downsizing is still dribbling out in some cases. Over the last month or so, I have recommended several plays with the proviso of small investments and fairly tight stop loss levels, and that strategy is still the best way to go, but it may be time to broaden the focus away from just fracking companies.

One other thing that should be taken into consideration here is that the oil price recovery we have seen in the last few months has yet to be fully replicated in the natural gas market. The U.S. land based shale oil and fracking companies that have led the decline are often more dependent on gas than oil, so recovery there is still nascent. A more pure oil play can be had by investing in offshore firms, where the ratio of oil recovered to gas is usually higher.

Deepwater rigs also generally have a high cost base too, so companies involved in that field have been particularly hard hit. From an optimistic perspective that means that if the recovery in oil is real and sustainable those companies have the most upside potential. Drilling stocks such as Noble (NE) and Seadrill (SDRL) have been hit extremely hard; NE is down roughly 60 percent and SDRL has lost around 80 percent from the highs last summer to the lows last month. Those summer levels may not be seen again for a while, if ever, but some kind of…




Oilprice - The No. 1 Source for Oil & Energy News