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Tsvetana Paraskova

Tsvetana Paraskova

Tsvetana is a writer for the U.S.-based Divergente LLC consulting firm with over a decade of experience writing for news outlets such as iNVEZZ and…

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Russia To See Oil Revenues Jump Fivefold

Putin

Due to the oil price rally, Russia expects its oil and gas revenues to jump fivefold compared to the expected revenues set in its 2018 budget, according to the Finance Ministry that now expects Russia to post a budget surplus for the first time since 2011.

Oil and gas exports account for around 40 percent of Russia’s federal budget revenues.

Russia’s revenues from oil and gas sales are now expected at US$44.4 billion (2.74 trillion Russian rubles) for 2018, up from US$8.5 billion (527.6 billion rubles), according to a budget amendment by the Finance Ministry.

Due to the unexpectedly high oil prices, Russia is currently on track to book a first budget surplus since 2011, at 0.45 percent of gross domestic product (GDP), compared to previous expectations for a 1.3 percent of GDP deficit. The previous forecasts, however, were based on assumptions that the Urals crude blend would average around $40 a barrel. Between January and April, the price of Urals has averaged $66.15.

The additional oil revenues that Russia has earned above the Urals price assumption of $40 a barrel will be allocated to reserves instead of to spending, TASS news agency reports.

Analysts commented on the proposed budget amendment that Russia will have more revenues while it continues to plan for expenditures close to the original budget law. Related: Iran Accuses U.S. Of Pushing Up Oil Prices

“This will provide a very useful cushion to lean on if there are some adverse macro or geopolitical shocks,” Ivan Tchakarov, chief economist at Citi in Moscow, told Reuters.

A few days ago, President Vladimir Putin was quoted as saying that Russia was mulling over ways to ‘get free’ of the U.S. dollar burden in oil trade as part of a plan to boost its national economic sovereignty.

“Oil is traded in dollars on the exchange,” TASS news agency quoted Putin as saying. “Certainly, we are thinking about what we need to do in order to get free of this burden.”

By Tsvetana Paraskova for Oilprice.com

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  • JG on May 21 2018 said:
    I don't think the math adds up. Event at USD 45 Billion oil and gas revenues couldn't possibly account for 40 percent of Russia's Federal budget. Russia's Budget is far greater than $100 billion (near 17 trillion rubles or USD 275 billion). How did you reach the 40 percent figure?

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