• 3 minutes Biden Seeks $2 Trillion Clean Energy And Infrastructure Spending Boost
  • 5 minutes While U.S. Pipelines Are Under Siege, China Streamlines Its Oil and Gas Network
  • 8 minutes Gazprom fails to exempt Nord Stream-2 from EU market rules
  • 34 mins Trumpist lies about coronavirus too bad for Facebook - BANNED!
  • 2 hours The World is Facing a Solar Panel Waste Problem
  • 13 hours Trump Suggests Delaying Election Amid Fraud Claims
  • 12 hours Rational analysis of CV19 from Harvard Medical School
  • 12 hours Biden admits he has been tested for Cognitive Decline several times. Didn't show any proof of test results.
  • 7 hours The Core Issue Of US Chaos..Finally disclosed
  • 41 mins Brent above $45. Holding breath for $50??
  • 11 hours Open letter from Politico about US-russian relations
  • 12 hours China's impending economic meltdown
  • 12 hours Why Oil could hit $100
  • 7 hours Pompeo upsets China; oil & gas prices to fall
  • 10 hours Russia Trying To Steal COVID-19 Vaccine Data, Say UK, U.S. and Canada
  • 1 day End Game For Oil? OPEC Prepares For An Age Of Dwindling Demand
James Stafford

James Stafford

James Stafford is the Editor of Oilprice.com

More Info

Kerogen Oil Shale: The Next Rock of Ages?

As with everything else, it’s all about economic feasibility. This is the story of kerogen (oil shale), and could be a huge one, or it could just stay in the ground for a few more centuries until we figure out how to get it out of the rock without breaking the bank.

Oil shale is not conventional oil that can flow through geological formations. It is a fine-grained sedimentary rock containing kerogen which is a fossilized mixture of insoluble organic material that, when heated, breaks down into crude oil and natural gas. For this reason, oil shale—not to be confused with shale oil—is often called “kerogen”.

Chemically, oil shale consists of carbon, hydrogen, oxygen, nitrogen, and sulphur and forms from compacted organic material. This rock has not been geologically buried for a time sufficient to produce conventional hydrocarbons. Though it hasn’t been buried for long enough to form conventional hydrocarbons, oil shale formation began millions of years ago through the deposition of silt and organic debris on lakebeds and sea bottoms.

Is it a good investment? Well, that depends.

Other than what we’ve noted above, we don’t know too much about kerogen, other than it cannot be extracted via traditional methods, or through the use of organic chemical solvents. The thing is, kerogen is INSIDE the rock itself—part and parcel of the rock—so in order to get it out one has to use thermal technologies.…




Oilprice - The No. 1 Source for Oil & Energy News