• 4 minutes China's Economy and Subsequent Energy Demand To Decelerate Sharply Through 2024
  • 7 minutes Beijing Must Face Reality That Taiwan is Independent
  • 11 minutes Phase One trade deal, for China it is all about technology war
  • 14 minutes Shale Oil Fiasco
  • 35 mins We're freezing! Isn't it great? The carbon tax must be working!
  • 2 hours Which emissions are worse?: Cows vs. Keystone Pipeline
  • 10 hours Trump capitulated
  • 17 hours Thanks to Trump, the Iranian Mullahs Are Going Bankrupt
  • 2 hours Indonesia Stands Up to China. Will Japan Help?
  • 3 hours What's the Endgame Here?
  • 50 mins Trump has changed into a World Leader
  • 4 hours Turkey Muscles-In on Israel-Greece-Cyprus EastMed Gas Pipeline Deal. Erdogan Still Dreaming of Ottoman Empire II.
  • 10 hours US Shale: Technology
  • 11 hours Gravity is a scam!
  • 1 day Yet another Petroteq debt for equity deal
  • 1 day Three oil pipeline projects inch toward goal-line for Canada
  • 1 day The Libyan Oil in a Sea of Chaos, War and Disruptions
Irina Slav

Irina Slav

Irina is a writer for Oilprice.com with over a decade of experience writing on the oil and gas industry.

More Info

Premium Content

Iraq Security Forces Disperse Oil Field Sit-Ins

Iraq’s security troops have dispersed two sit-ins in southern Iraq, one at a key oil field, local media report. The field is West Qurna-1, one of the biggest in this part of the country.

Iraqi News cited an unnamed source as saying that protesters had gathered at the field and at the provincial council in Basra and had started preparing for sit-ins before the security troops interfered and forcibly dispersed them.

The sit-ins come a day after Prime Minister Haider al-Abadi announced on his Twitter account the firing of Electricity Minister due to “poor performance”. Blackouts are one of the reasons for the widespread protests that began three weeks ago in Basra and spread across Iraq. At least two previous electricity ministers, Deutsche Welle notes, have been accused of corruption.

Besides corruption, protesters have cited unemployment, poor governance, and alleged Iranian interference in Iraq’s internal affairs. Earlier this month, protesters gathered at three fields in southern Iraq—Rumaila, West Qurna-1 and West Qurna-2—but were quickly dispersed by the police. Related: Coke, Meth And Booze: The Flip Side Of The Permian Oil Boom

The Basra province, where a lot of the protests are taking place, is home to Iraq’s largest oil fields and accounts for more than 95 percent of the country’s state revenues thanks to oil exports. However, it is also as underdeveloped as most of the rest of Iraq, Al Jazeera notes in a recent overview of the protests, with chronic blackouts, lack of access to clean drinking water, and unemployment.

In fact, what sparked the protests was a sudden cut in Iranian electricity supplies to Basra in early July. The cut came during a heat wave that prompted thousands of locals to take to the street, also prompting them to share their other grievances. According to Al Jazeera, Iran cut exports to force Baghdad to pay its dues for electricity supplied. Since then, protests have been growing despite efforts by the government to quash them and its promise to address the grievances.

By Irina Slav for Oilprice.com

More Top Reads From Oilprice.com:




Download The Free Oilprice App Today

Back to homepage




Leave a comment

Leave a comment




Oilprice - The No. 1 Source for Oil & Energy News