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Martin Tillier

Martin Tillier

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Halliburton (HAL) Has Disappointed In The Past, But Is Worth Another Try

“Once bitten, twice shy” is an old adage that should not be in the lexicon of any trader or investor. Just because a strategy or individual play didn’t work out once doesn’t mean it won’t the next time. If anything, an unforeseen short term drop in a stock that you have identified as undervalued from a long term perspective just means that, when it does start to rise, the ascent will be quicker than you might otherwise expect. Going back to the idea, when the time is right, is still a good trade even if the last attempt resulted in a loss. Halliburton (HAL), for example, is a stock that I have recommended in the past, but the fact that oil prices have languished and the result of that has come through in earnings and projections has led to several false starts. Despite that, it still looks like a good buy in front of next week’s earnings figures.

To be clear, I am not suggesting that you hold onto things forever and hope that they come back. Those who take an active role in managing their accounts should always be seeking to be making money from the maximum amount of their trades. Sitting on a loser because you believe it will come back some day is just leaving dead money sitting around; money that, in the short term could be better deployed elsewhere. If, however, your disciplined approach to account management leads to you cutting a position when it hits your stop loss level, that simply indicates that your timing, not your long…




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