• 5 hours U.S. Oil Production To Increase in November As Rig Count Falls
  • 7 hours Gazprom Neft Unhappy With OPEC-Russia Production Cut Deal
  • 9 hours Disputed Venezuelan Vote Could Lead To More Sanctions, Clashes
  • 11 hours EU Urges U.S. Congress To Protect Iran Nuclear Deal
  • 13 hours Oil Rig Explosion In Louisiana Leaves 7 Injured, 1 Still Missing
  • 14 hours Aramco Says No Plans To Shelve IPO
  • 3 days Trump Passes Iran Nuclear Deal Back to Congress
  • 3 days Texas Shutters More Coal-Fired Plants
  • 3 days Oil Trading Firm Expects Unprecedented U.S. Crude Exports
  • 3 days UK’s FCA Met With Aramco Prior To Proposing Listing Rule Change
  • 4 days Chevron Quits Australian Deepwater Oil Exploration
  • 4 days Europe Braces For End Of Iran Nuclear Deal
  • 4 days Renewable Energy Startup Powering Native American Protest Camp
  • 4 days Husky Energy Set To Restart Pipeline
  • 4 days Russia, Morocco Sign String Of Energy And Military Deals
  • 4 days Norway Looks To Cut Some Of Its Generous Tax Breaks For EVs
  • 4 days China Set To Continue Crude Oil Buying Spree, IEA Says
  • 4 days India Needs Help To Boost Oil Production
  • 4 days Shell Buys One Of Europe’s Largest EV Charging Networks
  • 5 days Oil Throwback: BP Is Bringing Back The Amoco Brand
  • 5 days Libyan Oil Output Covers 25% Of 2017 Budget Needs
  • 5 days District Judge Rules Dakota Access Can Continue Operating
  • 5 days Surprise Oil Inventory Build Shocks Markets
  • 5 days France’s Biggest Listed Bank To Stop Funding Shale, Oil Sands Projects
  • 5 days Syria’s Kurds Aim To Control Oil-Rich Areas
  • 5 days Chinese Teapots Create $5B JV To Compete With State Firms
  • 6 days Oil M&A Deals Set To Rise
  • 6 days South Sudan Tightens Oil Industry Security
  • 6 days Over 1 Million Bpd Remain Offline In Gulf Of Mexico
  • 6 days Turkmenistan To Spend $93-Billion On Oil And Gas Sector
  • 6 days Indian Hydrocarbon Projects Get $300 Billion Boost Over 10 Years
  • 6 days Record U.S. Crude Exports Squeeze North Sea Oil
  • 6 days Iraq Aims To Reopen Kirkuk-Turkey Oil Pipeline Bypassing Kurdistan
  • 6 days Supply Crunch To Lead To Oil Price Spike By 2020s, Expert Says
  • 7 days Saudi Arabia Ups November Oil Exports To 7-Million Bpd
  • 7 days Niger Delta State Looks To Break Free From Oil
  • 7 days Brazilian Conglomerate To Expand Into Renewables
  • 7 days Kurdish Independence Could Spark Civil War
  • 7 days Chevron, Total Waiting In The Wings As Shell Mulls Majnoon Exit
  • 7 days The Capital Of Coal Is Looking For Other Options
This Major Political Shift Could Rock Copper Markets

This Major Political Shift Could Rock Copper Markets

Chile’s upcoming Presidential elections could…

5 Players To Watch In The FinTech Revolution

5 Players To Watch In The FinTech Revolution

Artificial Intelligence and Blockchain tech…

James Burgess

James Burgess

James Burgess studied Business Management at the University of Nottingham. He has worked in property development, chartered surveying, marketing, law, and accounts. He has also…

More Info

Second Coal Ash Leak at NC Site

Duke Energy’s problems grew worse on February 18, with reports surfacing that a second toxic leak has occurred at its Eden plant on the Dan River. A 36-inch stormwater pipe sprung a leak, pouring effluent laced with arsenic into the river. Nearby water samples indicated elevate levels of arsenic in the river. Duke said that it would temporarily cap the leak until it could figure out a long-term solution.

The North Carolina State Department of Environment and Natural Resources expressed concern about a potential leak last week. It has ordered Duke to halt the flow of contaminated water.

This follows a February 2nd spill that leaked coal ash into the river, also from the Eden site. That spill discharged 30,000 to 39,000 tons of coal ash and there is evidence that toxic coal ash is coating the bottom of the Dan River as far as 70 miles away. Duke struggled to contain the spill, which lasted nearly a week. Federal investigators opened an investigation, looking to see if there was any criminal activity stemming from the incident. The U.S. Attorney’s Office in Raleigh subpoenaed emails between Duke and North Carolina regulators. North Carolina’s Governor is a former employee of Duke Energy, and critics have accused the government of being too lax with the industry.

Related Article: Oil Train Derailments Reaching Crisis Point

Government officials maintain that drinking water downstream from the Dan River remains safe because municipal water treatment plants are filtering out toxic chemicals. The effects on the wildlife and fish in the river are unknown. Duke apologized for the spill and said that it would take accountability, although a Duke official also said that any costs incurred from the accident will not be borne by the company but instead passed onto its ratepayers.

Separately, Duke reported its quarterly earnings on February 18, posting a 58% increase in profits in the fourth quarter.

By James Burgess of Oilprice.com



Join the discussion | Back to homepage

Leave a comment

Leave a comment

Oilprice - The No. 1 Source for Oil & Energy News