• 4 minutes US-backed coup in Venezuela not so smooth
  • 7 minutes Why Trump will win the wall fight
  • 11 minutes Oil imports by countries
  • 13 minutes Maduro Asks OPEC For Help Against U.S. Sanctions
  • 1 min Climate Change: A Summer of Storms and Smog Is Coming
  • 16 hours Venezuela: Nicolas Maduro closes border with Brazil
  • 4 hours The Quick Read On MBS's Tour of Pakistan, India And China
  • 6 hours Iran Starts Gulf War Games, To Test Submarine-Launched Missiles
  • 5 hours BMW to add 2,000 more jobs at Dingolfing plant
  • 15 hours Tension On The Edge: Pakistan Urges U.N. To Intervene Over Kashmir Tension With India
  • 6 hours Teens For Climate: Swedish Student Leader Wins EU Pledge To Spend Billions On Climate
  • 17 hours Amazon’s Exit Could Scare Off Tech Companies From New York
  • 14 hours Itt looks like natural gas may be at its lowest price ever.
  • 2 hours Saudi A to Splash $100 Bln on India
  • 8 hours NEW FERUKA REFINERY
  • 1 hour Washington Eyes Crackdown On OPEC

Wyoming Joins Iowa, Ohio In Anti-Pipeline Protest Legislation

pipelines

Wyoming has become the third state to introduce a bill targeting pipeline protests, envisaging penalties of up to 10 years in prison for “impeding critical infrastructure” and up to US$1 million in fines for any organization that “aids, abets, solicits, encourages, hires, conspires, commands or procures a person to commit the crime of impeding critical infrastructure.”

The bill follows a similar document proposed by Ohio senators in early February, and another one, approved by the Iowa Senate a couple of days ago. All three bills are modeled on a document called the Critical Infrastructure Protection Act, produced by the American Legislative Exchange Council that is close to the energy industry. The ALEC bill itself was based on two Oklahoma documents that have already been signed into law. More states are considering similar legislation.

On the one hand, the legislative drive to deter anti-pipeline protests can be seen as the fossil fuel industry seeking to tie the hands of environmentalists unjustly. On the other, energy infrastructure is deemed critical everywhere in the world. The legislative moves, coming amid a flurry of vocal opposition and protests targeting existing and new pipelines, could just as easily be interpreted as a way for the state governments to avoid protests escalating to actual attacks against oil and gas infrastructure.

Protesters, meanwhile, are not showing any sings that they plan to stop opposing pipelines. The most notable among these, and the biggest, was no doubt the Dakota Access protest that had thousands of people gather at the site of a controversial section of the pipeline to oppose its construction.

The gathering eventually had to be dispersed, but the initiators of the protests, the Standing Rock Sioux tribe as well as three other tribes and a number of environmental organizations, are not giving up, attacking the project in court.

Critics of the bills warn that their sponsors are taking things too far, criminalizing legitimate protest behavior.

By Irina Slav for Oilprice.com

More Top Reads From Oilprice.com:



Join the discussion | Back to homepage

Leave a comment

Leave a comment

Oilprice - The No. 1 Source for Oil & Energy News