• 4 minutes What If Canada Had Wind and Not Oilsands?
  • 8 minutes EU Confirms Trade Retaliation Measures vs. U.S. To Take Effect on June 22
  • 17 minutes Could oil demand collapse rapidly? Yup, sure could.
  • 8 hours Kaplan Says Rising Oil Prices Won't Hurt US Economy
  • 17 hours Tariffs to derail $83.7 Billion Chinese Investment in West Virginia
  • 2 hours Could oil demand collapse rapidly? Yup, sure could.
  • 3 hours U.S. Withdraws From U.N. Human Rights Council
  • 1 hour Saudi Arabia turns to solar
  • 17 hours EU Confirms Trade Retaliation Measures vs. U.S. To Take Effect on June 22
  • 1 hour "The Gasoline Car Is a Car With a Future"
  • 3 hours Gazprom Exports to EU Hit Record
  • 54 mins What If Canada Had Wind and Not Oilsands?
  • 3 hours OPEC Meeting Could End Without Decision - Irony Note Added from OPEC Children's Book
  • 21 hours North Korea, China Discuss 'True Peace', Denuclearization
  • 22 mins Russia's Energy Minister says Oil Prices Balanced at $75, so Wants to Increase OPEC + Russia Oil by 1.5 mbpd
  • 7 hours China’s Plastic Waste Ban Will Leave 111 Million Tons of Trash With Nowhere To Go
  • 21 hours WE Solutions plans to print cars
  • 1 day Hey Oil Bulls - How Long Till Increasing Oil Prices and Strengthening Dollar Start Killing Demand in Developing Countries?
  • 14 hours EVs Could Help Coal Demand
Can U.S. Shale And OPEC Find Common Ground?

Can U.S. Shale And OPEC Find Common Ground?

OPEC and U.S. shale have…

Oil Markets On Edge For OPEC Meeting

Oil Markets On Edge For OPEC Meeting

Oil markets saw moderate volatility…

What is up with the gdp-less recovery?

That is what people are calling it, although I would not use that term.  Jon Hilsenrath has the best overview I have seen, here is one excerpt:

Robert Gordon, a Northwestern University professor who tracks productivity closely, says he sees “clear signs everywhere” that a productivity slowdown is happening. Last year, productivity—measured as the output of workers for every hour they work—grew just 0.4% and has grown at a 0.9% annual rate over the past seven quarters. Productivity did spurt higher in 2009—during this stretch of fear-induced firing—but over a longer stretch it shows additional signs of slowing. Worker productivity has grown at an annual rate of 1.7% since 2004, down from 2.6% growth in the decade before that.

Mr. Gordon agrees with Ms. Romer’s overfiring story. But he says the longer-run threat to productivity shouldn’t be overlooked. “The productivity numbers have been dismal,” he says. That is an explanation this fragile economy can do without and that policy makers shouldn’t ignore.

To view the full article please click here.



Join the discussion | Back to homepage

Leave a comment

Leave a comment

Oilprice - The No. 1 Source for Oil & Energy News