• 4 minutes US-backed coup in Venezuela not so smooth
  • 7 minutes Why Trump will win the wall fight
  • 11 minutes Oil imports by countries
  • 13 minutes Maduro Asks OPEC For Help Against U.S. Sanctions
  • 3 hours Climate Change: A Summer of Storms and Smog Is Coming
  • 42 mins Teens For Climate: Swedish Student Leader Wins EU Pledge To Spend Billions On Climate
  • 1 day The Quick Read On MBS's Tour of Pakistan, India And China
  • 1 day BMW to add 2,000 more jobs at Dingolfing plant
  • 1 day Iran Starts Gulf War Games, To Test Submarine-Launched Missiles
  • 1 day Tension On The Edge: Pakistan Urges U.N. To Intervene Over Kashmir Tension With India
  • 2 hours An expected? Saudi Arabia Would Need Oil At $80-$85 A Barrel To Balance Budget
  • 10 hours Washington Eyes Crackdown On OPEC
  • 1 day Saudi A to Splash $100 Bln on India
  • 2 days NEW FERUKA REFINERY
  • 1 day Indian Oil Signs First Annual Deal For U.S. OilIndian Oil Signs First Annual Deal For U.S. Oil
  • 10 hours Can the World Survive without Saudi Oil?
  • 1 day Venezuela: Nicolas Maduro closes border with Brazil

What is up with the gdp-less recovery?

That is what people are calling it, although I would not use that term.  Jon Hilsenrath has the best overview I have seen, here is one excerpt:

Robert Gordon, a Northwestern University professor who tracks productivity closely, says he sees “clear signs everywhere” that a productivity slowdown is happening. Last year, productivity—measured as the output of workers for every hour they work—grew just 0.4% and has grown at a 0.9% annual rate over the past seven quarters. Productivity did spurt higher in 2009—during this stretch of fear-induced firing—but over a longer stretch it shows additional signs of slowing. Worker productivity has grown at an annual rate of 1.7% since 2004, down from 2.6% growth in the decade before that.

Mr. Gordon agrees with Ms. Romer’s overfiring story. But he says the longer-run threat to productivity shouldn’t be overlooked. “The productivity numbers have been dismal,” he says. That is an explanation this fragile economy can do without and that policy makers shouldn’t ignore.

To view the full article please click here.



Join the discussion | Back to homepage

Leave a comment

Leave a comment

Oilprice - The No. 1 Source for Oil & Energy News