• 6 minutes Trump vs. MbS
  • 11 minutes Can the World Survive without Saudi Oil?
  • 15 minutes WTI @ $75.75, headed for $64 - 67
  • 16 hours Satellite Moons to Replace Streetlamps?!
  • 1 day US top CEO's are spending their own money on the midterm elections
  • 10 hours EU to Splash Billions on Battery Factories
  • 13 hours U.S. Shale Oil Debt: Deep the Denial
  • 21 hours The Balkans Are Coming Apart at the Seams Again
  • 6 hours Owning stocks long-term low risk?
  • 9 hours The Dirt on Clean Electric Cars
  • 2 days OPEC Is Struggling To Deliver On Increased Output Pledge
  • 1 day Uber IPO Proposals Value Company at $120 Billion
  • 23 hours 47 Oil & Gas Projects Expected to Start in SE Asia between 2018 & 2025
  • 1 day A $2 Trillion Saudi Aramco IPO Keeps Getting Less Realistic
  • 2 days U.N. About Climate Change: World Must Take 'Unprecedented' Steps To Avert Worst Effects
  • 4 hours The end of "King Coal" in the Wales
U.S. Shale’s Glory Days Are Numbered

U.S. Shale’s Glory Days Are Numbered

That decline rates in U.S.…

South Korea Cuts Iran Oil Imports To Zero

South Korea Cuts Iran Oil Imports To Zero

U.S. ally South Korea has…

What is up with the gdp-less recovery?

That is what people are calling it, although I would not use that term.  Jon Hilsenrath has the best overview I have seen, here is one excerpt:

Robert Gordon, a Northwestern University professor who tracks productivity closely, says he sees “clear signs everywhere” that a productivity slowdown is happening. Last year, productivity—measured as the output of workers for every hour they work—grew just 0.4% and has grown at a 0.9% annual rate over the past seven quarters. Productivity did spurt higher in 2009—during this stretch of fear-induced firing—but over a longer stretch it shows additional signs of slowing. Worker productivity has grown at an annual rate of 1.7% since 2004, down from 2.6% growth in the decade before that.

Mr. Gordon agrees with Ms. Romer’s overfiring story. But he says the longer-run threat to productivity shouldn’t be overlooked. “The productivity numbers have been dismal,” he says. That is an explanation this fragile economy can do without and that policy makers shouldn’t ignore.

To view the full article please click here.


x

Join the discussion | Back to homepage

Leave a comment

Leave a comment

Oilprice - The No. 1 Source for Oil & Energy News