• 8 minutes U.S. Shale Oil Debt: Deep the Denial
  • 13 minutes WTI @ $75.75, headed for $64 - 67
  • 16 minutes Trump vs. MbS
  • 6 hours Knoema: Crude Oil Price Forecast: 2018, 2019 and Long Term to 2030
  • 14 hours Nuclear Pact/Cold War: Moscow Wants U.S. To Explain Planned Exit From Arms Treaty
  • 2 hours Merkel Aims To Ward Off Diesel Car Ban In Germany
  • 14 hours Why I Think Natural Gas is the Logical Future of Energy
  • 13 hours A $2 Trillion Saudi Aramco IPO Keeps Getting Less Realistic
  • 6 hours Get on Those Bicycles to Save the World
  • 10 hours Iraq war and Possible Lies
  • 1 day Satellite Moons to Replace Streetlamps?!
  • 1 day Can “Renewables” Dent the World’s need for Electricity?
  • 1 day Closing the circle around Saudi Arabia: Where did Khashoggi disappear?
  • 21 hours Long-Awaited Slowdown in China Exports Still Isn’t Happening
  • 8 hours EU to Splash Billions on Battery Factories
  • 24 hours Can the World Survive without Saudi Oil?
U.S. And Saudis? Expect Business As Usual

U.S. And Saudis? Expect Business As Usual

The fallout from the Khashoggi…

Using Engineered Timber as a Sustainable Building Material

All around the world construction is an industry that consumes a lot of energy and is generally renowned for being unsustainable. One solution that is growing in popularity is the use of engineered wood, a sustainable material that is strong enough to support even a tall building.

The world’s tallest wood-framed building currently is a block of boutique apartments in Melbourne, Australia. Standing 106 feet tall the building, known as Forté, was the fruit of Lend Lease Corp. Ltd, the giant development firm famous for building the Sydney Opera House and helping with the construction of the Petronas Towers in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, the world tallest building from 1998 to 2004.

The structural beams were built from cross-laminated timber (CLT). A material produced by gluing together, under high pressure, layers of wood, alternating between lengthwise and crosswise grain. Compressing the layers under high pressure results in an incredibly dense material that is far stronger than normal wooden beams; and, whilst fire might be a natural fear to consider with a wooden building, CLT is highly flame resistant due to its density.

Click here to read the full article.



Join the discussion | Back to homepage

Leave a comment

Leave a comment

Oilprice - The No. 1 Source for Oil & Energy News