• 3 minutes e-car sales collapse
  • 6 minutes America Is Exceptional in Its Political Divide
  • 11 minutes Perovskites, a ‘dirt cheap’ alternative to silicon, just got a lot more efficient
  • 11 mins GREEN NEW DEAL = BLIZZARD OF LIES
  • 2 days How Far Have We Really Gotten With Alternative Energy
  • 7 days What fool thought this was a good idea...
  • 10 days They pay YOU to TAKE Natural Gas
  • 10 days Why does this keep coming up? (The Renewable Energy Land Rush Could Threaten Food Security)
  • 5 days A question...
  • 16 days The United States produced more crude oil than any nation, at any time.
Time Running Out for BHP's Anglo American Bid

Time Running Out for BHP's Anglo American Bid

The clock is counting down…

Groundhog Day for OPEC+

Groundhog Day for OPEC+

Ahead of a critical meeting…

Shell Sees Profit Soar On Higher Oil Prices

Shell (NYSE:RDS.A) on Thursday reported that first-quarter earnings had soared 42 percent annually, reaping the benefits of higher oil prices and strong integrated gas performance, but disappointing with a weaker-than-expected cash flow generation.

Shell’s current cost of supply (CCS) earnings attributable to shareholders excluding identified items—its in-house metric for net profit—jumped to US$5.322 billion in Q1 2018, up from US$3.754 billion for the same period last year, and ahead of analyst expectations of US$5.2 billion.

This past quarter’s profit was the highest Shell has booked since the end of 2014. Higher oil and gas prices, strong performance in the integrated gas division, and improved profitability in the upstream helped Shell to post its best profit since the downturn began.

Lower refining margins and lower contributions from trading affected the downstream business whose profits dropped to US$1.687 billion in Q1 2018 from US$2.489 billion in Q1 2017, as higher oil prices make refining market conditions less favorable.

While Shell beat on profits—as widely expected due to the higher oil prices—its cash flow came in below forecasts and sent its shares down in London, Amsterdam, and New York today. Cash flow from operating activities in Q1 2018 dropped to $9.4 billion from $9.5 billion in the first quarter of 2017, although it recovered from the US$7.275 billion in Q4 2017 that had also missed forecasts.

Related: Are Investors Turning Away From Big Oil?

“I think the problem with the numbers this morning is that the cash flow generation was disappointing. The earnings were very strong but it didn’t get pulled through into cash generation,” Jason Gammel, equity analyst at Jefferies, told CNBC today.

CEO Ben van Beurden commented in Shell’s press release that “Our commitment to capital discipline is unchanged, we are making good progress with our $30 billion divestment programme and our outlook for free cash flow – which covered our cash dividend and interest this quarter and over the last year – is consistent with our intent to buy back at least $25 billion of our shares over the period 2018-2020.”

However, Shell’s CFO Jessica Uhl did not specify when the group would begin those buybacks, saying that the oil major would focus on cutting debt and paying dividends first.

ADVERTISEMENT

By Tsvetana Paraskova for Oilprice.com

More Top Reads From Oilprice.com:



Join the discussion | Back to homepage



Leave a comment
  • CorvetteKid on April 26 2018 said:
    Ann, you are probably richer than 95% of the world's population, with internet access and a PC.

    As for Shell....their cash flow would be higher if they stopped blowing $$$ on Greenmail projects to appease envirowhackos.
  • Ann on April 26 2018 said:
    and the rich get richer on the backs
    of the poor working people

Leave a comment

EXXON Mobil -0.35
Open57.81 Trading Vol.6.96M Previous Vol.241.7B
BUY 57.15
Sell 57.00
Oilprice - The No. 1 Source for Oil & Energy News