• 4 minutes Is The Three Gorges Dam on the Brink of Collapse?
  • 8 minutes The Coal Industry May Never Recover From The Pandemic
  • 11 minutes China Raids Bank and Investor Accounts
  • 2 hours Sources confirm Trump to sign two new Executive orders.
  • 8 hours Why Wind is pitiful for most regions on earth
  • 44 mins CV19: New York 21% infection rate + 40% Existing T-Cell immunity = 61% = Herd Immunity ?
  • 34 mins In a Nutshell...
  • 18 hours During March, April, May the states with the highest infections/deaths were NY, NJ, Ma. . . . . Today (June) the three have the best numbers. How ? Herd immunity ?
  • 2 hours No More Love: Kanye West Breaks With Trump, Claims 2020 Run Is Not A Stunt
  • 6 hours A Real Reality Check on "Green Hydrogen"
  • 10 hours Why Oil could hit $100
  • 3 hours Better Days Are (Not) Coming: Fed Officials Suggest U.S. Recovery May Be Stalling
  • 3 days Joe Biden to black radio host, "If you don't vote for me you ain't black". That's our Democratic Party nominee ?
  • 37 mins Putin Paid Militants to Kill US Troops
  • 2 days Coronavirus hype biggest political hoax in history
Big Oil’s Investment Risk Is Spiking

Big Oil’s Investment Risk Is Spiking

Oil majors have been a…

Debt Destroys A Shale Giant

Debt Destroys A Shale Giant

Chesapeake has finally succumb to…

Nanowire Ink Increases Solar Panel Efficiency by 25%

This week, Sweden based Sol Voltaics has announced that it intends to commercialise its new product that it believes could be a real game changer for the solar industry. The product consists of an ink that contains microscopic nanowire semiconductors which can boost the efficiency of solar panels by 25% at very little cost.

Increasing solar panel efficiency is important as it is the easiest way to reduce the cost of solar power, in terms of both the cost per watt for energy generation, and also the installation costs as fewer panels will be needed.

The idea of using nanowires to improve solar efficiency has been around for years, but the problem was always that nanowires are expensive and slow to produce in large numbers. They are generally grown on a substrate in a batch process that does not scale up.

Click here to read full article.



Join the discussion | Back to homepage



Leave a comment

Leave a comment

Oilprice - The No. 1 Source for Oil & Energy News