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Oil Jumps As U.S. Offers To Cut Tariffs By 50%

Oil Jumps As U.S. Offers To Cut Tariffs By 50%

Oil prices rose on Thursday…

Is A New Price War Looming For OPEC?

Is A New Price War Looming For OPEC?

OPEC has long maintained a…

Europe is Failing due to the Lack of a Dominant Country to Lead the Way

We face the danger that the euro, the world’s No. 2 reserve currency, could implode.  Such an event wouldn’t be just another depreciation or collapse of a currency peg; instead, it would mean that one of the world’s major economic units doesn’t work as currently constituted.

We are realizing just how much international economic order depends on the role of a dominant country — sometimes known as a hegemon — that sets clear rules and accepts some responsibility for the consequences.  For historical reasons, Germany isn’t up to playing the role formerly held by Britain and, to some extent, still held today by the United States.  (But when it comes to the euro zone, the United States is on the sidelines.)

THERE appears to be a power vacuum, and the implications are alarming. We may be entering a new world where international cooperative arrangements, in environmental areas as well as finance, are commonly recognized as impossible.  If the core European nations cannot coordinate effectively, what can we expect in dealings with China, Russia and other countries that have less of a common background and understanding?

I consider this a big deal, even beyond its immediate macroeconomic ramifications, which of course are a big deal too.

There is a second, more technical point too:

Click here for the full article

By. Tyler Cowen



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