• 5 minutes Covid-19 logarithmic growth
  • 8 minutes Why Trump Is Right to Re-Open the Economy
  • 12 minutes Charts of COVID-19 Fatality Rate by Age and Sex
  • 14 minutes China Takes Axe To Alternative Energy Funding, Slashing Subsidies For Solar And Wind
  • 6 mins Which producers will shut in first?
  • 1 hour The Most Annoying Person You Have Encountered During Lockdown
  • 1 hour We are witnesses to the end of the petroleum age
  • 4 hours Its going to be an oil bloodbath
  • 52 mins Breaking News - Strategic Strikes on Chinese Troll Farms
  • 4 hours As Saudi Arabia Boosts Oil Output, Some Tankers Have Nowhere to Go
  • 9 hours Death Match: Climate Change vs. Coronavirus
  • 15 hours How to Create a Pandemic
  • 6 mins >>The falling of the Persian Gulf oil empires is near <<
  • 31 mins Saudi Aramco struggling to raise money for this year's dividend of $75 billion. Now trying to sell their pipelines for $10 billion.
  • 2 hours Natural gas price to spike when USA is out of the market
  • 15 hours TRUMP pushing Hydroxychloroquine + Zpak therapy forward despite FDA conservative approach. As he reasons, "What have we got to lose ?"
  • 16 hours Where's the storage?

China Looks to Russia's Hydroelectricity to Meet Growing Energy Demands

China Looks to Russia's Hydroelectricity to Meet Growing Energy Demands

Industrialisation has enabled economies in Asia to develop faster than ever, and this has shifted the balance of world energy consumption from the West to the East. China is by far the largest energy consumer, mostly driven by its huge manufacturing sector and infrastructural development projects.

Whilst the rapid growth creates opportunities, it also creates challenges for China. It now accounts for 30% of total world energy consumption, and has invested heavily in developing new sources of power generation.

Unfortunately the majority of this power, over 700GW, is coming from coal fired power plants, leading the country to use over 2.7 billion tonnes of coal each year, and produce the largest amount of carbon emissions in the world.

Aware that their carbon emission levels are too high they have set aggressive renewable energy targets, and installed massive amounts of renewable sources. China is the leader in carbon capture technology, and last year became the largest producer of electricity from wind farms; however it is still far behind, and cannot achieve the targets on its own.

China must look to import energy from other nations, and Russia is closer than any other major energy supplier. Both countries are aware of the potential relationship that exists in terms of energy supply and demand and are eager to take advantage of the riches available.

Russia has the second largest hydroelectric potential in the world and can generate more than 800 TWh each year, yet even so only about 20% of that potential is currently developed, with the majority of undeveloped potential in Eastern Siberia, close to China. However in this part of the world the level of energy infrastructure is poor, which hinders attempts to transport electricity between the two nations. Nevertheless the future energy cooperation between the two countries looks very promising.

By. Joao Peixe of Oilprice.com



Join the discussion | Back to homepage




Leave a comment

Leave a comment

Oilprice - The No. 1 Source for Oil & Energy News