• 3 minutes Don't sneeze. Coronavirus is a threat to oil markets and global economies
  • 5 minutes Boris Johnson taken decision about 5G Huawei ban by delay (fait accompli method)
  • 9 minutes This Battery Uses Up CO2 to Create Energy
  • 12 minutes Shale Oil Fiasco
  • 7 hours Historian Slams Greta. I Don't See Her in Beijing or Delhi.
  • 2 hours Governments that wasted massive windfalls
  • 1 day Let’s take a Historical walk around the Rig
  • 5 hours We're freezing! Isn't it great? The carbon tax must be working!
  • 10 hours Trump has changed into a World Leader
  • 3 days US (provocations and tech containment) and Chinese ( restraint and long game) strategies in hegemony conflict
  • 20 hours Beijing Must Face Reality That Taiwan is Independent
  • 1 day Yesterday POLEXIT started (Poles do not want to leave EU, but Poland made the decisive step towards becoming dictatorship, in breach of accession treaty)
  • 1 day Tesla Will ‘Disappear’ Or ‘Lose 80%’ Of Its Value
  • 3 days Might be Time for NG Producers to Find New Career
  • 37 mins 2nd Annual Great Oil Price Prediction Challenge of 2019
  • 7 hours Trump capitulated

China Looks to Russia's Hydroelectricity to Meet Growing Energy Demands

China Looks to Russia's Hydroelectricity to Meet Growing Energy Demands

Industrialisation has enabled economies in Asia to develop faster than ever, and this has shifted the balance of world energy consumption from the West to the East. China is by far the largest energy consumer, mostly driven by its huge manufacturing sector and infrastructural development projects.

Whilst the rapid growth creates opportunities, it also creates challenges for China. It now accounts for 30% of total world energy consumption, and has invested heavily in developing new sources of power generation.

Unfortunately the majority of this power, over 700GW, is coming from coal fired power plants, leading the country to use over 2.7 billion tonnes of coal each year, and produce the largest amount of carbon emissions in the world.

Aware that their carbon emission levels are too high they have set aggressive renewable energy targets, and installed massive amounts of renewable sources. China is the leader in carbon capture technology, and last year became the largest producer of electricity from wind farms; however it is still far behind, and cannot achieve the targets on its own.

China must look to import energy from other nations, and Russia is closer than any other major energy supplier. Both countries are aware of the potential relationship that exists in terms of energy supply and demand and are eager to take advantage of the riches available.

Russia has the second largest hydroelectric potential in the world and can generate more than 800 TWh each year, yet even so only about 20% of that potential is currently developed, with the majority of undeveloped potential in Eastern Siberia, close to China. However in this part of the world the level of energy infrastructure is poor, which hinders attempts to transport electricity between the two nations. Nevertheless the future energy cooperation between the two countries looks very promising.

By. Joao Peixe of Oilprice.com



Join the discussion | Back to homepage


Leave a comment

Leave a comment

Oilprice - The No. 1 Source for Oil & Energy News
Download on the App Store Get it on Google Play