• 5 minutes Desperate Call or... Erdogan Says Turkey Will Boycott U.S. Electronics
  • 11 minutes Don't Expect Too Much: Despite a Soaring Economy, America's Annual Pay Increase Isn't Budging
  • 15 minutes WTI @ 67.50, charts show $62.50 next
  • 18 hours The EU Loses The Principles On Which It Was Built
  • 10 hours Starvation, horror in Venezuela
  • 44 mins Mike Shellman's musings on "Cartoon of the Week"
  • 14 hours Why hydrogen economics does not work
  • 11 hours Again Google: Brazil May Probe Google Over Its Cell Phone System
  • 10 hours Tesla Faces 3 Lawsuits Over “Funding Secured” Tweet
  • 23 hours WSJ *still* refuses to acknowledge U.S. Shale Oil industry's horrible economics and debts
  • 2 days Chinese EV Startup Nio Files for $1.8 billion IPO
  • 3 hours Saudi Fund Wants to Take Tesla Private?
  • 1 day Crude Price going to $62.50
  • 6 hours California Solar Mandate Based on False Facts
  • 6 hours Oil prices---Tug of War: Sanctions vs. Trade War
  • 23 hours Saudi Arabia Cuts Diplomatic Ties with Canada
Tsvetana Paraskova

Tsvetana Paraskova

Tsvetana is a writer for the U.S.-based Divergente LLC consulting firm with over a decade of experience writing for news outlets such as iNVEZZ and…

More Info

Trending Discussions

Venezuela’s Parliament Outlaws Maduro’s Cryptocurrency

Maduro

The Venezuelan Parliament, run by the opposition, voted on Tuesday to declare Nicolas Maduro’s plan to issue an oil-backed cryptocurrency—the Petro—illegal, claiming that it violates the constitution and attempts to mortgage part of the country’s oil reserves.

Since losing majority in the National Assembly in 2016, Maduro has been ignoring the legislature, and the pro-government Supreme Court has overturned almost every measure that the opposition-dominated parliament has passed since then.

In a July 2017 election boycotted by the opposition, Venezuela elected the Constituent Assembly, which triggered the stricter sanctions that the U.S. slapped on the country in August, including prohibiting U.S. persons or companies from participating in the new debt issued by Venezuela or its state oil firm PDVSA.

In early December, Maduro shocked both analysts who follow the country’s flirting with default and the cryptocurrency community by announcing that Venezuela was planning to launch the petro cryptocurrency, backed by oil, diamonds, and gold reserves, to help the country to “advance in issues of monetary sovereignty, to make financial transactions and overcome the financial blockade.”

At the end of December, Venezuela’s Communications Minister Jorge Rodríguez said that the country was getting ready to launch within days its own digital currency—El Petro—which will be backed by more than 5.3 billion barrels of oil and support US$267 billion worth of financial instruments.

While Maduro is recruiting miners for the digital currency, the opposition-led Parliament denounced the cryptocurrency move, called it illegal, and warned potential investors and cryptocurrency market players that the Petro emission is illegal, as is any other obligation by the state of Venezuela backed by oil or other mineral reserves. Related: Grading 2017 Oil Price Predictions

According to Parliament, the petro issuance is an attempt by the government to avoid control over public debt operations as set in article 312 of Venezuela’s constitution.

“This is not a cryptocurrency, this is a forward sale of Venezuelan oil,” legislator Jorge Millan said, as quoted by Reuters. “It is tailor-made for corruption,” Millan added.

According to digital currency experts, Venezuela’s inability to manage its economy and the Socialist party’s historic lack of respect for private property will deter investors from snapping up petros.  

By Tsvetana Paraskova for Oilprice.com

More Top Reads From Oilprice.com:




Back to homepage

Trending Discussions


Leave a comment
  • John Brown on January 10 2018 said:
    I doubt anybody was stupid enough to participate in Maduro's worthless crypto currency the Petro to start. Venezuela has a real currency that is basically worthless, the Bolivar, because Maduro/Venezuela can't produce enough oil, Gold, and diamonds to back it and pay for things, so there's now way adding a phony e-currency was going to work. Even if the Maduro regime really intended to back it with Oil, Gold, and Diamonds, since they don't produce enough to meet the countries needs now you'd pretty much have to get a drill, pick axe, and bucket and go drill/dig for your own oil, gold, diamonds if you really wanted to convert Petros into something real.
    What you have now is a warning from the opposition to the Maduro Communist tyranny that they consider the PETRO illegal, and will never back it. So if you want to use the PETRO, not only do you need to take into account that its really not backed by anything the country can really produce in the amounts needed, if the Maduro tyranny falls in the future, and its hardly stable, there won't be anybody to even talk to about any electric Petros anyone was stupid enough obtain and hold?

Leave a comment




Oilprice - The No. 1 Source for Oil & Energy News