• 7 hours Walmart and VW's Electrify America Team Up To Build Massive EV Charging Network Across US
  • 12 hours Vistra Energy Says Coal Won't Come Back
  • 22 hours Maduro Under Pressure: EU Says May Impose More Sanctions On Venezuela If Democracy Undermined
  • 15 hours Bills passed to guard energy grid from cyberattacks
  • 19 hours Without U.S., Germany...These 11 Countries Could Be The Future Of The Global Economy
  • 13 hours Is Today's Tesla News Good or Bad?
  • 13 hours Robot Completes Hardest Job Known to Man
  • 16 hours Trans Mountain Gets More Support Than You Might Think
  • 22 hours Trump: "Larry, go get it done,'” - US to rejoin TPP
  • 24 hours Facebook, Microsoft, and Other Tech Companies Pledge To Never Help Governments Launch Cyberattacks
  • 22 hours Anybody Watching Aluminum Stocks Today??
  • 17 hours Trump's top energy adviser resigns
  • 2 days Mike Pompeo, CIA Chief, Met Secretly with NK Leader Kim Jong-un
  • 1 day Russia retaliate: Our Response to U.S. Sanctions Will Be Precise And Painful
  • 22 hours Citi Raises Oil Price Forecast Due to Concern About Possible Loss of Iran, Venezuela Supply
  • 1 day New EV ETF Bets Bigger on BHP than Tesla
Dave Forest

Dave Forest

Dave is Managing Geologist of the Pierce Points Daily E-Letter.

More Info

Trending Discussions

Here's The Next Thing in Shale

We've talked about unconventional gas drilling underway in Chile. Now it appears another Latin American nation wants to get in on the act: Brazil.

U.S. Energy Secretary Ernest Moniz talked shale during a visit to Brazil this weekend. Moniz noted that U.S energy companies are eager to use their unconventional expertise to help exploit Brazil's resources.

His comments were undoubtedly spurred by Brazil's upcoming November oil and gas bid round. The auction will be the first in the nation's history aimed at unconventional resources.

There is certainly geologic potential here. Earlier this year, state hydrocarbon agency ANP estimated that Brazil may hold over 500 trillion cubic feet of unconventional gas reserves.

The upcoming bid round will feature 240 blocks in both frontier basins and established producing areas.

Like Chile, Brazil has a well-established industrial sector. Which could provide the sort of services support needed to make shale gas economic.

In fact, Brazil may be an even better place for shale. By virtue of the country's well-established conventional hydrocarbon sector. And the built-up services industry that drives it.

The gas market here is reasonable. With Brazil in fact looking to increase domestic supply and move away from expensive LNG.

With all these pluses, this might be a place where shale can work. We'll see what the bidding is like November 28 to 29.

Here's to the new shale frontiers,

By. Dave Forest




Back to homepage

Trending Discussions


Leave a comment

Leave a comment




Oilprice - The No. 1 Source for Oil & Energy News