• 4 minutes Some Good News on Climate Change Maybe
  • 7 minutes Cuba Charges U.S. Moving Special Forces, Preparing Venezuelan Intervention
  • 12 minutes Washington Eyes Crackdown On OPEC
  • 15 minutes Solar and Wind Will Not "Save" the Climate
  • 3 hours Why Trump will win the wall fight
  • 6 hours Prospective Cause of Little Ice Age
  • 49 mins *Happy Dance* ... U.S. Shale Oil Slowdown
  • 9 hours L.A. Mayor Ditches Gas Plant Plans
  • 2 hours is climate change a hoax? $2 Trillion/year worth of programs intended to be handed out by politicians and bureaucrats?
  • 10 hours students walk out of school in protest of climate change
  • 10 hours Maduro Asks OPEC For Help Against U.S. Sanctions
  • 2 days Most Wanted Man In Latin America For AP Agency: Maduro Reveals Secret Meetings With US Envoy
  • 4 hours And for the final post in this series of 3: we’ll have a look at the Decline Rates in the Permian
  • 1 day Ford In Big Trouble: Three Recalls In North America
  • 1 day Why Is Japan Not a Leader in Renewables?
  • 22 hours Is the Green race a race from energy dependence.
Alt Text

Oil Prices Rise As Saudis Pledge Deeper Cuts

Saudi Oil Minister al-Falih has…

Alt Text

Oil Prices Drop After Touching 2019 High

Oil prices fell on Monday…

Alt Text

The Next Big Threat For Oil Comes From China

Oil product prices often lead…

Tsvetana Paraskova

Tsvetana Paraskova

Tsvetana is a writer for the U.S.-based Divergente LLC consulting firm with over a decade of experience writing for news outlets such as iNVEZZ and…

More Info

Trending Discussions

Experts Remain Bearish On Brent – See $45 Oil Throughout 2016

Economists and analysts have kept their average Brent price outlook for 2016 almost unchanged at US$44.78 per barrel, as growing hurdles to a global deal on production limits put downside pressure on crude oil prices, according to a Reuters poll out on Monday.

A total of 35 economists and analysts surveyed by Reuters reckon that the Brent prices would average US$57.08 next year. U.S. light crude CLc1 is expected to average US$43.46 this year and US$55.22 next year.

So far this year, Brent has averaged US$43.93 and WTI has averaged US$42.31.

At the time of writing, WTI Crude traded down 0.53 percent at US$48.44, while the Brent Crude was down 0.49 percent at US$50.43.

In the previous Reuters poll - when OPEC producers had just agreed to work toward a deal to cut their total crude production at between 32.5 million bpd and 33 million bpd – analysts had their doubts that the cartel would pull off a real deal.

Back then the experts cut their estimates for the Brent LCOc1 price to US$44.74 from the US$45.44 price outlook in August—the second outlook reduction in a row following five consecutive upward revisions. The 2017 forecast for the Brent price was then reduced to US$57.28 from US$57.90.

In today’s Reuters poll, a possible failure of an OPEC deal is not the only downside risk to higher oil prices. Economists also see a possible Fed rate hike, a slowdown in Chinese growth, and less tension in Nigeria and Libya as potential hurdles in seeing substantial oil price increases.

If OPEC fails to reach a deal, a sell-off could result in oil prices plunging to US$40, and the supply glut could linger until at least the second half next year, analysts polled by Reuters say.

This weekend’s OPEC-only and OPEC-non-OPEC meetings in Vienna did not result in any substantial preliminary decision ahead of the November 30 OPEC summit, at which production limits are expected to be discussed in detail.

Heading into the weekend meeting, OPEC members were divided, with two of the heavyweights, Iran and Iraq, disputing OPEC data on output. A week before that Iraq put further pressure on the chances of a possible deal, saying that it should be exempt from production cuts because of the war it is fighting against ISIS.

By Tsvetana Paraskova for Oilprice.com

More Top Reads From Oilprice.com:




Download The Free Oilprice App Today

Back to homepage

Trending Discussions


Leave a comment
  • Ness on October 31 2016 said:
    Eventually the market will wake up and so uh oh what just happened. The entire oil industry is broke and US shale can't save us FYI shale players on now making return on gross investment that investors demand either and just take a look at land costs to see how costs are starting to escalate once again. GE and BH dont have to work for nothing anymore and more consolidation will happen on the service side driving costs up for O £ G players Exxon increased borrowings by 13 billion just to pay dividends. Venezuela will collapse.
    All the so called experts are lulling everyone into a false sense of security

Leave a comment




Oilprice - The No. 1 Source for Oil & Energy News