• 6 minutes U.S. Shale Oil Debt: Deep the Denial
  • 12 minutes Knoema: Crude Oil Price Forecast: 2018, 2019 and Long Term to 2030
  • 17 minutes WTI @ $75.75, headed for $64 - 67
  • 2 hours Trump vs. MbS
  • 8 hours Satellite Moons to Replace Streetlamps?!
  • 9 mins Nucelar Pact/Cold War: Moscow Wants U.S. To Explain Planned Exit From Arms Treaty
  • 2 hours Why I Think Natural Gas is the Logical Future of Energy
  • 2 days EU to Splash Billions on Battery Factories
  • 8 hours Can “Renewables” Dent the World’s need for Electricity?
  • 1 day The Dirt on Clean Electric Cars
  • 22 hours Owning stocks long-term low risk?
  • 2 hours Get on Those Bicycles to Save the World
  • 2 days The Balkans Are Coming Apart at the Seams Again
  • 2 days The end of "King Coal" in the Wales
  • 11 hours Closing the circle around Saudi Arabia: Where did Khashoggi disappear?
  • 2 hours Can the World Survive without Saudi Oil?
Alt Text

How The Trade War Could Benefit Australian Gas

As the U.S.-China tit-for-tat tariff…

Alt Text

The Perfect Storm Bringing China And Russia Together

A variety of geopolitical and…

Jim Hyerczyk

Jim Hyerczyk

Fundamental and technical analyst with 30 years experience.

More Info

Trending Discussions

Why NatGas Has Room To Rally

Natural Gas

June Natural Gas futures are in a position to post a strong gain for the week following a spike to the upside on May 11, following a smaller storage injection than forecast.

Since reaching a top at $3.422 the week-ending April 7, the market has straddled the middle of its December to March price range with traders hoping for a catalyst to trigger a move that would create some volatility. No one likes a choppy, two-sided trade.

The April to early May price action was typical for this time of year, however, because it’s not hot for increased demand from increased air-conditioner usage, and not too cool for heating demand. This low demand tends to support an increase in supply which weighs on prices and usually drives them lower into the start of the summer.

This year has been a little different from others. Although a lid may have been placed on the market the last five weeks, a floor has also been in place because of relatively low production.

Since the start of the year, U.S. production has remained at its lowest level in three years, averaging just 70.8 billion cubic feet per day during the past 30 days. That compares with 72.0 Bcf during the same period in 2016, 73.4 Bcf in 2015 and 67.9 Bcf in 2014.

In addition to the lower production, bullish traders have also been encouraged by stronger exports, particularly to Mexico. Data from the U.S. Energy Information Administration indicates that U.S. exports were expected to reach 7.3 Bcf the…

To read the full article

Please sign up and become a premium OilPrice.com member to gain access to read the full article.

RegisterLogin

Trending Discussions





Oilprice - The No. 1 Source for Oil & Energy News