• 4 minutes Your idea of oil/gas prices next ten years
  • 7 minutes WTI Heading for $60
  • 13 minutes Could EVs Become Cheaper than ICE Cars by 2023?
  • 1 day Pence says South China Sea Doesn't Belong To Any One Nation
  • 3 hours Is California becoming a National Security Risk to the U.S.?
  • 2 days Anyone holding Nvidia stock?
  • 17 hours Why does US never need to have an oil production cut?
  • 1 day Germany Discusses Lifting Ban on Deporting Syrians
  • 9 hours US continues imports of Russian gas which it insists Europe should stop buying
  • 2 days UK Power and loss of power stations
  • 4 hours Trump administration slaps sanctions on Saudis over Khashoggi's death
  • 43 mins Pros and Cons of Coal
  • 2 days China Claims To Have Successfully Developed a Quantum Radar That Can Detect 'Invisible' Fighter Jets
  • 2 days I Believe I Can Fly: Proposed U.S. Space Force Budget Could Be Less Than $5 Billion
  • 2 days A Sane Take on Nord Stream 2
  • 19 hours Commission: U.S. Could Lose Wars With Russia, China
Alt Text

Big Oil Wins Ballot Initiatives In Colorado, Washington

Tuesday’s energy-restricting ballot initiatives were…

Alt Text

GE's Fight For Survival

General Electric’s decision to sell…

Alt Text

Oil Majors Win Big In Midterms

The energy industry won quite…

Tsvetana Paraskova

Tsvetana Paraskova

Tsvetana is a writer for the U.S.-based Divergente LLC consulting firm with over a decade of experience writing for news outlets such as iNVEZZ and…

More Info

Trending Discussions

U.S. Sanctions Wreak Havoc On Russia’s Oil Industry

The U.S. sanctions on Russia have affected investment in Russian oil and gas exploration projects, U.S. officials say, while Congress is considering further sanctions on the energy and banking sectors to punish Moscow for the threat it poses to the United States.

At Senate hearings on Tuesday, a Treasury official said that U.S. sanctions have curtailed investment in Russian oil and gas exploration projects necessary to grow Russia’s production. Senators and witnesses who provided testimony discussed the impact of the sanctions, and Senator Mike Crapo (R-Idaho), the Chairman of the United States Senate Committee on Banking, Housing and Urban Affairs that held one of the hearings, said that if Vladimir Putin doesn’t change his behavior, sanctions would “likely remain in place until he’s no longer in power and Crimea is returned.”

Since January 2017, the current U.S. Administration has sanctioned 217 Russian-related individuals and entities for a broad range of activities, Sigal Mandelker, Under Secretary of the Treasury for Terrorism and Financial Intelligence, said on Tuesday in her testimony before the U.S. Senate Committee on Banking, Housing, and Urban Affairs. The Administration has also introduced prohibitions on the provision of goods, services, and technology in support of certain energy projects in Russia.

“Building on sanctions implemented since 2014, the impacts of our Russia-related sanctions are felt far beyond the targeted entities and persons,” Mandelker said, noting that “In the energy sector, our sanctions have limited important investment in exploratory energy projects needed to help grow Russia’s oil and gas production capacity.” Related: Why Mexico’s Oil Production Could Fall Even Further

Total foreign direct investment into Russia has declined more than 5 percent since 2013, while U.S. investment has plunged by 80 percent since then.

“Russia is taking note of these impacts,” said Mandelker.

“Though Russia’s malign activities continue, we believe its adventurism undoubtedly has been checked by the knowledge that we can bring much more economic pain to bear using our powerful range of authorities – and that we will not hesitate to do so if its conduct does not demonstrably and significantly change,” the Treasury under secretary noted.

Before the testimonies started, Senator Crapo said that “Congress itself is positioned to do more. There are bills in this committee and in the foreign relations committee which seek to escalate economic pain throughout Russia’s banking and energy sectors and sovereign debt markets.”

According to Russia-based analysts who have spoken to Reuters, the ‘bill from hell’ of hard-hitting sanctions against Russia that U.S. Senators introduced earlier this month is unlikely to have a wide-ranging impact on Russia’s oil industry, because Russian firms now rely almost entirely on domestic and Chinese banks for funding, and have lessened their dependence on Western drilling technology. Related: Trump Administration Embraces Energy Dominance Agenda

However, it was Russia’s own natural resources ministry that admitted last week that the sanctions had hampered natural gas project developments in the country. In a report about Russia’s oil and gas resources and their development for the period 2016-2017, the ministry said that sanctions against Russian oil and gas companies that limit the flow of foreign investment, new technologies, and equipment for the sector complicate the development of new projects in Russia, especially in offshore areas and in hard-to-extract resources. In the period 2016-2017, not a single significant gas project was launched, while gas firms focused instead on working at already operational projects, the Russian ministry said in its report.

Gas production at firms Novatek and Lukoil dropped in 2016 compared to 2015, due to the sanctions against those companies, the report said.

Meanwhile, the U.S. Treasury imposed sanctions on Tuesday on Russia-based shipping companies Primorye Maritime Logistics and Gudzon Shipping, as well as on six vessels and on persons involved in the ship-to-ship transfer of refined petroleum products with North Korea-flagged vessels, an activity expressly prohibited by the UN Security Council (UNSC). In a separate action on Tuesday, the Treasury also designated Russian individuals and entities for trying to circumvent U.S. sanctions.

Still, many U.S. lawmakers want tougher sanctions on Russia, including on its energy and sovereign debt, saying that existing sanctions have not brought Russian economy “to its knees.”

By Tsvetana Paraskova for Oilprice.com

More Top Reads From Oilprice.com:




Back to homepage

Trending Discussions


Leave a comment
  • jack ma on August 23 2018 said:
    Russia is no threat unless one considers them competition in the energy industry with the USA taking the position of dollar hegemony and world control. Many in the USA view fair competition as a 'enemy' in nature. Russia is a glorious country with a great heritage founded in deep culture and nationalism. They have completed their dedollarization efforts and sold almost all of their USA debt. Russia poses no threat other than the fact that they will no longer be subjected to forces that may lead them into a vassal state of the USA. They cannot be effectively sanctioned as you suggest, because they are not using the dollar. Learn about Russia, and you may find that these opinions are unfair and unjust and simply Western propaganda. IMHO
  • jack ma on August 23 2018 said:
    Russia is no threat unless one considers them competition in the energy industry with the USA taking the position of dollar hegemony and world control. Many in the USA view fair competition as a 'enemy' in nature. Russia is a glorious country with a great heritage founded in deep culture and nationalism. They have completed their dedollarization efforts and sold almost all of their USA debt. Russia poses no threat other than the fact that they will no longer be subjected to forces that may lead them into a vassal state of the USA. They cannot be effectively sanctioned as you suggest, because they are not using the dollar. Learn about Russia, and you may find that these opinions are unfair and unjust and simply Western propaganda. IMHO
  • XTX on August 23 2018 said:
    What Russia needs is what happened in Teheran in 1979 (the public storming of US Embassy and taking staff there as hostages).

    Only way to protect independence and soverenity of Russia is to expel Americans out of the country and to invade Ukraine by force (the same as Iran did against Iraq in 1980-1988 war).
  • Mamdouh G Salameh on August 23 2018 said:
    The claim that US sanctions have wreaked havoc on Russia’s oil industry is self-delusional and wishful thinking. US sanctions on Russia are becoming a big joke with hardly any bite. They will never bring the Russian economy to its knees.

    The target of the new sanctions like the previous ones is Russia’s oil and gas industry with the sole purpose of undermining Russia’s emergence as an energy superpower.

    Since the United States slapped sanctions on Russia in 2014 over the Crimea annexation, the Russian economy has diversified extensively and Russian oil companies have drastically cut their exposure to Western bank funding and have resorted to home-grown drilling technology to develop their oil and gas resources rather than depend on imported technology. Moreover, as a result of diversification, the Russian economy can now live forever with an oil price of $40 or less.

    Russian oil and gas companies now rely almost entirely on domestic and Chinese banks for funding. A case in point is that Russian gas producer Novatek’s $27-bn Yamal project which is the world’s largest Arctic LNG project was mostly financed by China under its “Belt and Road” initiative.

    Moreover, Russia’s grip on the European Union’s (EU) gas market will tighten further with the projected completion of the Nord Stream 2 and the Turk Stream gas pipelines by the end of 2019.

    President Putin’s meeting with German Chancellor Angela Merkel in Berlin on Saturday the 18th of August 2018 confirmed two things. One is that the Nord Stream 2 gas pipeline is unstoppable despite US sanctions on Russia. The other is that by inviting President Putin to Berlin a week after the US Congress enacted the latest mandatory sanctions against Russia, Mrs Merkel has indicated her opposition to these sanctions.

    Furthermore, Russia has now emerged as the world’s largest supplier of oil and gas to China. It exports almost 1.5 million barrels a day (mbd) of oil to China. Russia already has a contract to provide 38 billion cubic metres a year (bcm/y) of Russian natural gas to China for the next 30 years. This could be increased to 61bcm/y if Putin decides to cut the shipment of natural gas to Europe in favour of China. Also on 19 July, China received the first ever Russian LNG cargo from Russia’s Yamal project in the Arctic.

    Dr Mamdouh G Salameh
    International Oil Economist
    Visiting Professor of Energy Economics at ESCP Europe Business School, London
  • Franco DeCelis on August 24 2018 said:
    What these "sanctions" articles fail to realise is though the world's financial system was set up post 1945 to favour America, the US itself is changing.Even the people in California and Texts are being replaced by people from the Third World. China itself, daring the US to do anything in the South China Sea has the largest immigrant contribution in the US. Millions of engineers being churned out in China and large numbers of Chinese in Silicon Valley and in the Ivy League. A winning combination.

    As if that wasn't enough Russia is getting increasingly allied to China something which Kissinger always dreaded.

    There is nothing produced in the US which cannot be produced elsewhere. It is all held up by the world's financial system set up by the US and the use of the US dollar, not solid foundations. And the American addiction to sanctions and regime changing in weak countries has even nauseated European NATO countries. The in-fighting in America heralds a deep malaise and portends huge shifts to come.

Leave a comment




Oilprice - The No. 1 Source for Oil & Energy News
-->