• 4 minutes Permian in for Prosperous and Bright Future
  • 7 minutes Amount of Oil Usage in the United States
  • 10 minutes America Could Go Fully Electric Right Now
  • 2 mins Kalifornistan, CO2, clueless politicians, climate hustle
  • 2 hours JP Morgan Christyan Malek, report this Summer .. . We are at beginning of oil Super Cycle and will see $190 bbl Brent by 2025. LOL
  • 6 hours Something wicked this way comes
  • 2 days US after 4 more years of Trump?
  • 19 hours Tesla Battery Day (announcements on technology)
  • 22 hours Why NG falling n crude up?
  • 2 days Ten Years of Plunging Solar Prices
  • 2 hours Jake Gardner from Omaha wrongly charged with murder while protecting his business from rioters. . . . . . Kills himself
  • 3 days Famine, Economic Collapse of China on the Horizon?
  • 3 days .
Ross McCracken

Ross McCracken

Ross is an energy analyst, writer and consultant who was previously the Managing Editor of Platts Energy Economist

More Info

The Hydrogen Economy – A Bonanza For Natural Gas

The hydrogen economy might be on its way, but it won’t be arriving any time soon, not until after 2030 at least. If and when it does make an appearance, it is likely to be somewhat different to the image of popular imagination because a hydrogen economy will run primarily on natural gas.

Parts of the hydrogen economy are falling into place, notably significant gains in electrolysing power. Polymer Electrolyte Membrane (PEM) electrolysers now come as complete operating units the size of an ISO container, offering MWs rather than kWs of power and the production of hydrogen is sufficiently pressurised without the need for a compressor for vehicle fuelling or methanation.

A gradual roll out of infrastructure is taking place, but fuel cell vehicle sales lag far behind EVs. Europe, which to some extent is developing hydrogen transit corridors, has less than a 100 hydrogen refuelling stations in operation. Japan has about half that number and the US even less.

Scaling up

PEM technology is being tested at scale at Shell’s Rhineland refinery in Germany, where an electrolyser with peak capacity of 10 MW will be installed by 2020.

“If powered by renewable electricity, the green hydrogen will help reduce the carbon intensity of the site,” says Shell. It may well be powered by renewable electricity and as such is a valuable way of reducing refinery emissions, which is no easy task as emissions from refinery processes tend to be spread…




Oilprice - The No. 1 Source for Oil & Energy News