• 6 minutes Trump vs. MbS
  • 11 minutes Can the World Survive without Saudi Oil?
  • 15 minutes WTI @ $75.75, headed for $64 - 67
  • 8 hours Satellite Moons to Replace Streetlamps?!
  • 1 hour U.S. Shale Oil Debt: Deep the Denial
  • 2 days US top CEO's are spending their own money on the midterm elections
  • 1 day EU to Splash Billions on Battery Factories
  • 4 hours The Dirt on Clean Electric Cars
  • 2 hours Owning stocks long-term low risk?
  • 2 days The Balkans Are Coming Apart at the Seams Again
  • 8 hours Can “Renewables” Dent the World’s need for Electricity?
  • 2 days Uber IPO Proposals Value Company at $120 Billion
  • 2 days 47 Oil & Gas Projects Expected to Start in SE Asia between 2018 & 2025
  • 2 days A $2 Trillion Saudi Aramco IPO Keeps Getting Less Realistic
  • 2 days OPEC Is Struggling To Deliver On Increased Output Pledge
  • 20 hours The end of "King Coal" in the Wales
Alt Text

Oil Market Loses Its Bullish Edge

Bullish sentiment has dominated oil…

Alt Text

U.S. Oil Companies Face $240 Billion Debt Mountain

U.S. oil producers are facing…

Joao Peixe

Joao Peixe

Joao is a writer for Oilprice.com

More Info

Trending Discussions

Eastern African Energy Riches Attract Interest

Energy deposits located in east African nations and their offshore coastlines are increasingly drawing foreign investor interest.

Recent surveys have led analysts to estimate that Mozambique has over 6 trillion cubic feet of recoverable natural gas reserves while neighboring Tanzania’s natural gas reserves could exceed 7.5 trillion cubic feet.

Petroleum Development Consultants managing director David Aron noted, "The interesting question is whether there will be a (natural gas) liquefaction plant in both Tanzania and Mozambique or whether a single shared location could be developed," adding that Mozambique’s natural gas from its Pande and Temane onshore fields could be exported to neighboring South Africa while Tanzanian natural gas, produced from its offshore fields, would be used primarily for power generation, allowing it to reduce its imported energy costs, Nairobi’s The East African reported.

Both Tanzania and Mozambique are currently plagued by indigenous energy shortages, which lead to electrical blackouts.

Tanzania, East Africa’s second- biggest economy, before its natural gas fields begin production, is seeking to relieve its electricity shortages in the interim by promoting geothermal energy. Tanzanian Energy and Minerals Deputy Minister Adam Malima said, “We are moving toward more environmentally friendly sources of energy as our demand increases. We are looking to the private sector to see if there is interest in geothermal development.”

By. Joao Peixe, Deputy Editor OilPrice.com


x


Back to homepage

Trending Discussions


Leave a comment

Leave a comment




Oilprice - The No. 1 Source for Oil & Energy News