• 4 minutes U.S. Shale Output may Start Dropping Next Year
  • 8 minutes Read: OPEC WILL KILL US SHALE
  • 12 minutes Tidal Power Closer to Commercialisation
  • 16 minutes Washington Eyes Crackdown On OPEC
  • 4 hours Why U.S. Growers Are Betting The Farm On Soybeans Amid China Trade War
  • 4 hours Trump to Make Allies Pay More to Host US Bases
  • 6 hours BATTLE ROYAL: Law of "Supply and Demand". vs. OPEC/Saudi Oil Cartel
  • 4 hours US-backed coup in Venezuela not so smooth
  • 23 hours THE DEATH OF FOSSIL FUEL MARKETS
  • 16 hours Solar to Become World's Largest Power Source by 2050
  • 6 hours Biomass, Ethanol No Longer Green
  • 1 day this is why Climate Friendly Agendas Tread Water
  • 1 day Boeing Faces Safety Questions After Second 737 Crash In Five Months
  • 1 day Sounds Familiar: Netanyahu Tells Arab Citizens They’re Not Real Israelis
  • 21 hours Exxon Aims For $15-a-Barrel Costs In Giant Permian Operation
  • 5 hours Trump Tariffs On China Working
Dan Dicker

Dan Dicker

Dan Dicker is a 25 year veteran of the New York Mercantile Exchange where he traded crude oil, natural gas, unleaded gasoline and heating oil…

More Info

What You Missed In The Wood Mackenzie Report

Baker Hughes Employee

The latest report from Wood Mackenzie on U.S. and other non-OPEC oil exploration and production into 2025 is worthy of a very deep dive, because it gives terrific information, not just on where U.S. oil will be coming from in the next 10 years, but where the best likely places to invest will be.

I truly rely upon Wood Mackenzie as one of the finest, if not the finest energy analytics service out there – and their latest report serves as a tremendous template for our investment purposes. While the report is fairly long and wonky, the major takeaways can be culled from this one very important slide:

(Click to enlarge)

There’s so much information here, it’s hard to know where to start. But let’s start where Wood Mackenzie did, pointing out the tremendous gains in efficiencies, spacing and techniques for shale drilling, and discussing at length the terrific gains (drops) in breakeven production prices for various shale plays here in the U.S.

This note of dropping breakeven prices was heralded by most of the energy world as the important point of the report, showing that oil was much more likely to remain under $100 a barrel for a very long time, considering the profits that several core plays could achieve even at $40 a barrel.

But this, I submit, is an ultimately incorrect conclusion. Let’s look deeper.

First, it can be seen in the chart that the breakeven prices that are represented are weighted averages,…




Oilprice - The No. 1 Source for Oil & Energy News