• 1 day PDVSA Booted From Caribbean Terminal Over Unpaid Bills
  • 2 days Russia Warns Ukraine Against Recovering Oil Off The Coast Of Crimea
  • 2 days Syrian Rebels Relinquish Control Of Major Gas Field
  • 2 days Schlumberger Warns Of Moderating Investment In North America
  • 2 days Oil Prices Set For Weekly Loss As Profit Taking Trumps Mideast Tensions
  • 2 days Energy Regulators Look To Guard Grid From Cyberattacks
  • 2 days Mexico Says OPEC Has Not Approached It For Deal Extension
  • 2 days New Video Game Targets Oil Infrastructure
  • 2 days Shell Restarts Bonny Light Exports
  • 2 days Russia’s Rosneft To Take Majority In Kurdish Oil Pipeline
  • 2 days Iraq Struggles To Replace Damaged Kirkuk Equipment As Output Falls
  • 2 days British Utility Companies Brace For Major Reforms
  • 3 days Montenegro A ‘Sweet Spot’ Of Untapped Oil, Gas In The Adriatic
  • 3 days Rosneft CEO: Rising U.S. Shale A Downside Risk To Oil Prices
  • 3 days Brazil Could Invite More Bids For Unsold Pre-Salt Oil Blocks
  • 3 days OPEC/Non-OPEC Seek Consensus On Deal Before Nov Summit
  • 3 days London Stock Exchange Boss Defends Push To Win Aramco IPO
  • 3 days Rosneft Signs $400M Deal With Kurdistan
  • 3 days Kinder Morgan Warns About Trans Mountain Delays
  • 3 days India, China, U.S., Complain Of Venezuelan Crude Oil Quality Issues
  • 3 days Kurdish Kirkuk-Ceyhan Crude Oil Flows Plunge To 225,000 Bpd
  • 4 days Russia, Saudis Team Up To Boost Fracking Tech
  • 4 days Conflicting News Spurs Doubt On Aramco IPO
  • 4 days Exxon Starts Production At New Refinery In Texas
  • 4 days Iraq Asks BP To Redevelop Kirkuk Oil Fields
  • 5 days Oil Prices Rise After U.S. API Reports Strong Crude Inventory Draw
  • 5 days Oil Gains Spur Growth In Canada’s Oil Cities
  • 5 days China To Take 5% Of Rosneft’s Output In New Deal
  • 5 days UAE Oil Giant Seeks Partnership For Possible IPO
  • 5 days Planting Trees Could Cut Emissions As Much As Quitting Oil
  • 5 days VW Fails To Secure Critical Commodity For EVs
  • 5 days Enbridge Pipeline Expansion Finally Approved
  • 5 days Iraqi Forces Seize Control Of North Oil Co Fields In Kirkuk
  • 5 days OPEC Oil Deal Compliance Falls To 86%
  • 6 days U.S. Oil Production To Increase in November As Rig Count Falls
  • 6 days Gazprom Neft Unhappy With OPEC-Russia Production Cut Deal
  • 6 days Disputed Venezuelan Vote Could Lead To More Sanctions, Clashes
  • 6 days EU Urges U.S. Congress To Protect Iran Nuclear Deal
  • 6 days Oil Rig Explosion In Louisiana Leaves 7 Injured, 1 Still Missing
  • 6 days Aramco Says No Plans To Shelve IPO
Alt Text

Can Mali Maintain Its Gold Mining Status?

Mali could be about to…

Alt Text

Expect Mine Closures In This Key Gold Mining Nation

Major gold mining nation South…

Alt Text

This Key Gold Producer Sees Its Production Slump

Africa’s second gold producer Ghana…

Frik Els

Frik Els

Frik Els is editor for MINING.com in Vancouver, BC. Frik has been writing on business for the past 15 years covering the resource industry, investment, autos,…

More Info

Uncovering The Mystery Of South Africa’s Missing Gold Exports

Gold

According to a new study by the UN's Conference on Trade and Development, some commodity dependent developing countries "are losing as much as 67 percent of their exports worth billions of dollars to trade misinvoicing".

Trade misinvoicing – when export and import data between two countries do not align – is thought to be "one of the largest drivers of illicit financial flows from developing countries, so that the countries lose precious foreign exchange earnings, tax, and income that might otherwise be spent on development," according to the report.

UNCTAD's study uses data from up to two decades, covering exports of commodities such as cocoa, copper, gold, and oil from Chile, Cote d'Ivoire, Nigeria, South Africa, and Zambia.

Trade misinvoicing is thought to be one of the largest drivers of illicit financial flows from developing countries

"This research provides new detail on the magnitude of this issue, made even worse by the fact that some developing countries depend on just a handful of commodities for their health and education budgets," UNCTAD's Secretary-General, Mukhisa Kituyi, said:

"Importing countries and companies, which want to protect their reputations, should get ahead of the transparency game and partner with us to further research these issues."

The analysis shows patterns of trade misinvoicing on exports to China, Germany, Hong Kong (China), India, Italy, Japan, the Netherlands, Spain, Switzerland, the UK and the U.S.:

• Between 2000 and 2014, underinvoicing of gold exports from South Africa amounted to $78.2 billion, or 67 percent of total gold exports. Trade with the leading partners exhibited the highest amounts: India ($40 billion), Germany ($18.4 billion), Italy ($15.5 billion), and the UK ($13.7 billion).

• Between 1996 and 2014, underinvoicing of oil exports from Nigeria to the United States was worth $69.8 billion, or 24.9 percent of all oil exports to the U.S.

• Between 1995 and 2014, Zambia recorded $28.9 billion of copper exports to Switzerland, more than half of all its copper exports, but these exports did not show up in Switzerland's books.

• Between 1990 and 2014, Chile recorded $16.0 billion of copper exports to the Netherlands, but these exports did not show up in the Netherlands' books.

• Between 2000 and 2014, underinvoicing of iron ore exports from South Africa to China was worth $3 billion. Related: Did Oil Kill The Dinosaurs?

This is another explanation of the Chile/Netherlands puzzle too as Holland is a center of LME warehouses

According to the report, gold exports from South Africa "is peculiar in that there is a perfect correlation between gold export underinvoicing and the volume of exports as reported by the country’s trading partners:"

"This suggests that export underinvoicing is not due to underreporting of the true value of gold exports, but rather to pure smuggling of gold out of the country. In other words, virtually all gold exported by South Africa leaves the country unreported."

Source: UNCTAD computation using UN Comtrade data

The headline numbers may be startling, but there are explanations for the discrepancies that do not relate to nefarious trade practices or tax dodging. Related: Why Oil Prices Might Not Rebound Until 2019

The FT quotes Christine Clough, of the U.S.-based group Global Financial Integrity, as saying the "suspicious results involving trading hubs such as Switzerland, particularly with regard to Zambian copper, were often because the commodities never went there":

“On paper most of the copper goes to Switzerland, but in reality the majority of it goes straight to buyers in other countries,” she said.

Writing in Forbes, Tim Worstall also point to the fact that the numbers – particularly in Zambia – may be skewed by the fact that commodity traders like Glencore, based in Switzerland, would deliver Zambia copper from its mines directly into London Metal Exchange warehouses around the world:

"Some of it will end up in storage at least for a time. But the storage will be in bonded, LME approved, warehouses. And bonded here means that it doesn’t turn up on the import statistics of a country. Because it hasn’t, in the legal sense, entered a country. This is another explanation of the Chile/Netherlands puzzle too as Holland is a center of LME warehouses."

By Frik Els via Mining.com

More Top Reads From Oilprice.com:




Back to homepage


Leave a comment
  • Lester on July 22 2016 said:
    It is misleading or deceptive to write about flows of commodities in terms of dollars. It leaves the reader without a clue to actual volumes of trade. Commodities are not defined and measured in dollars but weight and volume. In the real world no purchasing manager goes on the market saying "I want to buy $600 worth of gold or coffee or cacao. Especially today when a boatload of iron ore can be paid in SK wons or rands.

Leave a comment




Oilprice - The No. 1 Source for Oil & Energy News