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Venezuela Oil Exports Climb As OPEC Agreement Kicks In

While OPEC begins to scale back oil production to offset at least partially some of the world’s excess oil supply, Venezuela was busy ramping up its oil exports—even in the face of US sanctions and Rosneft pulling the plug on its dealings with PDVSA.

After the United States sanctioned two Rosneft subsidiaries for propping up the Maduro regime by reselling oil and oil products from Venezuela to other markets including Asia, Rosneft pulled back, sending Venezuela’s March oil exports to lows not seen since mid-2019.

But in April, its exports recovered somewhat, Reuters said on Monday, as it found new shippers and resellers for its oil cargoes, including Mexico’s Libre Abordo and Schlager Business Group who have engaged in an oil-for-corn-and-water pact with Venezuela.

The Mexico companies are adamant that its dealings with Venezuela are strictly humanitarian in nature and that they did not violate U.S. sanctions. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo, however, announced last week that both the U.S. Embassy and Mexico are investing the matter on suspicion that they might be serving as shell companies for the purposes of skirting U.S. sanctions, according to Reuters.

Venezuela exported roughly nearly 850,000 bpd of crude oil and refined products in April—nearly 35,000 bpd more than in March.

The top destinations for Venezuela’s crude and crude products exports are China and India, although they are mainly end-users, and typically use intermediaries like Rosneft and the new Mexico companies to get the oil that would otherwise fall under the strict U.S. sanctions.

Despite finding two new middle men to replace a nervous Rosneft, Venezuela’s oil inventories are still high at roughly 30 million barrels as the U.S. sanctions have restricted buyers of PDVSA’s oil to a small few.

By Julianne Geiger for Oilprice.com

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  • Mamdouh Salameh on May 05 2020 said:
    That is good for Venezuela. Despite intrusive US sanctions, Venezuela has managed to keep its oil industry ticking and has also foiled US plans for regime change. Moreover, there are many buyers for Venezuelan crude oil.

    Top destinations for Venezuela’s crude and crude products exports are China and India. Both countries are continuing to buy Venezuelan crude through intermediaries despite US sanctions.

    Dr Mamdouh G Salameh
    International Oil Economist
    Visiting Professor of Energy Economics at ESCP Europe Business School, London
  • Thomas Franklin on May 04 2020 said:
    The article says that both the U.S. Embassy and Mexico are investing the matter. Did you mean investigating, or do I misunderstand the sentence?

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