• 4 minutes Some Good News on Climate Change Maybe
  • 7 minutes Cuba Charges U.S. Moving Special Forces, Preparing Venezuelan Intervention
  • 12 minutes Washington Eyes Crackdown On OPEC
  • 15 minutes Solar and Wind Will Not "Save" the Climate
  • 28 mins is climate change a hoax? $2 Trillion/year worth of programs intended to be handed out by politicians and bureaucrats?
  • 7 hours Why Trump will win the wall fight
  • 2 hours students walk out of school in protest of climate change
  • 14 hours Prospective Cause of Little Ice Age
  • 15 hours *Happy Dance* ... U.S. Shale Oil Slowdown
  • 13 hours L.A. Mayor Ditches Gas Plant Plans
  • 5 hours Maduro Asks OPEC For Help Against U.S. Sanctions
  • 2 days Most Wanted Man In Latin America For AP Agency: Maduro Reveals Secret Meetings With US Envoy
  • 2 days Ford In Big Trouble: Three Recalls In North America
  • 18 hours And for the final post in this series of 3: we’ll have a look at the Decline Rates in the Permian
  • 24 hours IT IS FINISHED. OPEC Victorious
  • 2 days Why Is Japan Not a Leader in Renewables?

US Waives The Jones Act Allowing Foreign Ships to Supply Fuel to the North East

The US Waives The Jones Act Allowing Foreign Ships to Help Supply Fuel to the North East

The Jones Act was created in 1920 to help support the maritime industry in the US by ensuring that any goods moved between US ports must be done so in domestically built ships, crewed by US citizens.

In a rare move, the Department of Homeland Security has decided to issue a waiver allowing foreign vessels to transport petrochemicals to ports in the north east, in an attempt to increase supply of the fuels in the region most affected by the passing of hurricane Sandy.

Related Article: Why US Energy and Economic Prospects Improve if Obama Loses

Foreign ships will supply Northeastern ports with products such as diesel and gasoline from refineries in the Gulf of Mexico; although the true effectiveness of this strategy is unknown due to the fact that most ports in the area are still without power.

The American Maritime Partnership (AMP) has said that it is not aware that US vessels are not able to make the deliveries themselves, however it “will not oppose waivers that are necessary to facilitate delivery of petroleum products into the regions affected by Hurricane Sandy.”

The waivers even allow ship owners to divert cargoes that are bound for Europe or Latin America to supply the depleted market in the North East. What effects this will have on fuel supply and prices in these continents is unknown.

By. Joao Peixe of Oilprice.com



Join the discussion | Back to homepage

Leave a comment

Leave a comment

Oilprice - The No. 1 Source for Oil & Energy News