• 3 minutes CoV-19: China, WHO, myth vs fact
  • 6 minutes Trump reinvented tariffs and it worked
  • 9 minutes IEA Sees First Global Oil Demand Drop in a Decade on Coronavirus
  • 12 minutes Question: Why are oil futures so low through 2020?
  • 21 hours "For the Public's Interest"
  • 4 hours Don't sneeze. Coronavirus is a threat to oil markets and global economies
  • 1 hour Natural Gas from Cow Poop Used to Save the Environment and Help Farmers
  • 10 hours Coronovairus, Phase One Agreement, Lower for Longer
  • 11 hours Weekly U.S. Imports of Crude Oil. No, the U.S. is NOT oil & gas self-sufficient.
  • 4 hours Is Pete Buttigieg emerging as the most likely challenger to Trump?
  • 1 day China's Dreams of World Leadership are Fading
  • 19 mins Is cheaper plastics feedstock on the horizon?
  • 1 day Cheap natural gas is making it very hard to go green
  • 1 day Peak Shale Will Send Oil Prices Sky High
  • 1 day Has Trump put the USA at the service of Israel?
  • 1 day Europe’s Green Deal: Same Hysteria, Same Destruction

U.S. Sees Rare Fall In Energy-Related CO2 Emissions In 2019

Power plant

The decrease in coal-derived energy in favor of natural gas-derived energy has the Energy Information Administration (EIA) forecasting that the CO2 emissions in the United States will fall in 2019, according to a new report by the agency on Monday.

In the year prior, energy-related CO2 emissions in the United States had increased by 2.7%.

Typically, the first quarter of the year is the highest, and sets the trend for energy-related CO2 emissions for the rest of the year, the EIA explained in its latest report. But in just a handful of years—six out of thirty—the remaining nine months of the year bucked the trend set in the first quarter.

The EIA is forecasting that 2019 is one of those rare years. So while the first quarter 2019 CO2 emissions mimic 2018 first-quarter emissions, the EIA is expecting that the overall 2019 emissions will actually be lower than in 2018.

The EIA is basing this optimism for lower CO2 emissions on the mild temperature forecasts for the remainder of the year, which it expects will keep energy demand below that of 2018.

“EIA forecasts that CO2 emissions from coal will decrease by 169 MMmt in 2019, the largest decrease in CO2 emissions from coal since 2015,” the EIA said.

Picking up some of that slack is an expected increase in natural gas C02 emissions of 53 MMmt as the mix of coal shrinks and natural gas grows in the overall energy mix. C02 emissions from petroleum is expected to be flat in 2019.

“Because the electric power sector consumes nearly 92% of the coal used in the United States, expectations for both overall lower electricity demand and a lower share of coal-fired electricity this summer lead EIA to forecast lower coal CO2 emissions.”

By Julianne Geiger for Oilprice.com

More Top Reads From Oilprice.com:



Join the discussion | Back to homepage


Leave a comment
  • Lee James on July 15 2019 said:
    This is good news, as long as fugitive gas and methane flaring figure into total CO2/CO2-equivalent for the year.

Leave a comment

Oilprice - The No. 1 Source for Oil & Energy News