• 4 minutes US-backed coup in Venezuela not so smooth
  • 7 minutes Why Trump will win the wall fight
  • 11 minutes Oil imports by countries
  • 13 minutes Maduro Asks OPEC For Help Against U.S. Sanctions
  • 3 hours Climate Change: A Summer of Storms and Smog Is Coming
  • 1 hour Teens For Climate: Swedish Student Leader Wins EU Pledge To Spend Billions On Climate
  • 1 day Tension On The Edge: Pakistan Urges U.N. To Intervene Over Kashmir Tension With India
  • 3 hours An expected? Saudi Arabia Would Need Oil At $80-$85 A Barrel To Balance Budget
  • 10 hours Washington Eyes Crackdown On OPEC
  • 1 day Saudi A to Splash $100 Bln on India
  • 1 day BMW to add 2,000 more jobs at Dingolfing plant
  • 1 day The Quick Read On MBS's Tour of Pakistan, India And China
  • 1 day Indian Oil Signs First Annual Deal For U.S. OilIndian Oil Signs First Annual Deal For U.S. Oil
  • 10 hours Can the World Survive without Saudi Oil?
  • 1 day Venezuela: Nicolas Maduro closes border with Brazil
  • 1 day Iran Starts Gulf War Games, To Test Submarine-Launched Missiles
  • 13 mins Mullahs Out Of Control: 'Get out of Syria,' Iran tells U.S
Why The Oil Rally Isn’t Over Yet

Why The Oil Rally Isn’t Over Yet

OPEC+ output cuts and several…

Oil Rally Continues Despite Soaring Shale Output

Oil Rally Continues Despite Soaring Shale Output

Oil prices rose to 3-month…

U.S. And Moscow Ramp Up Pressure On Greece Over Gas Pipelines

 Russian Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov says Europe’s only realistic choice for importing gas is through Moscow’s planned Turkish Stream pipeline, not a rival conduit, also through Turkey, that’s being promoted by the West.

Lavrov pushed back against U.S. pressure on Greece to choose the American-preferred route, the Trans-Anatolian Pipeline (TANAP). The Russian official spoke after a meeting in Belgrade with Serbian Foreign Minister Ivica Dacic.

“I believe that if the European Union bases its approach [to Turkish Stream] on a critical evaluation of the situation,” Lavrov said, “taking into consideration its own interest in ensuring European energy security, Brussels will support these talks [on Turkish Stream] and contribute to the realization of these ideas.”

Related: America’s Shadowy Energy Partnership With Azerbaijan

Already, Lavrov said, the initial work may be all but complete because Greece, Hungary, Macedonia, Serbia and other countries in Southeastern Europe have expressed interest in Turkish Stream. The pipeline would run from Russia through Turkey, then through Greece and elsewhere in Southern Europe.

“I believe what matters the most now is to consider practical aspects from the point of view of logistics and from the point of view of funding,” the Russian official said.

Related: Are US Drillers Actually Making A Comeback?

If built, the Turkish Stream pipeline would begin shipping some 63 billion cubic meters of gas annually by December 2016, which Lavrov said would bring “energy security” to Europe. TANAP would bring gas from Azerbaijan – and perhaps even from Turkmenistan on the other side of the Caspian Sea – through Turkey and into Europe.

Lavrov’s comments come after a trip by Amos Hochstein, the US State Department’s special envoy on energy affairs, who was sent to Athens to discuss the options with several Greek officials. Moscow is attempting to sway Greece in favor of its Turkish Stream project.

On May 8 Hochstein reported that both sides “agreed on more than we disagreed,” especially given that work on TANAP already has begun and Turkish Stream remains only a concept in search of a route.

Related: M&A The Only Survival Strategy For The Oil Sector Now

“Turkish Stream doesn’t exist,” he said. “There is no consortium to build it, there is no agreement to build it. … [I]n the meantime, [we should] focus on what’s important – the pipeline we already agreed to, that Greece already agreed to.”

Turkish Stream would replace the South Stream pipeline project to Europe, which was ended in late 2014 because of a European Union rule that forbids one entity to own both the pipeline and the gas it carries.

That project as well as Turkish Stream and TANAP are potential alternatives to Russia’s current method of shipping fuel from its state-run Gazprom to European customers. The EU now receives about 30 percent of its gas from Russia, and about half of it flows through Ukraine. But because of political and pricing disputes between Kiev and Moscow, the EU has been looking for other sources of fuel.

By Andy Tully of Oilprice.com

More Top Reads From Oilprice.com:



Join the discussion | Back to homepage

Leave a comment
  • andrew nichols on May 19 2015 said:
    But because of political and pricing disputes between Kiev and Moscow

    That's a polite way of describing an unwillingness to pay for supplied gas and outright theft!

Leave a comment

Oilprice - The No. 1 Source for Oil & Energy News