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Is It Time To Invest In Offshore?

Is It Time To Invest In Offshore?

The deepwater and offshore sectors…

Study: ’Toxic Masculinity’ Negatively Impacts The Environment

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Gender bias could have a link to climate change, a new study has suggested, with men who perceive their masculinity as threatened by a certain choice more likely to respond to the perceived threat by making an environmentally bad choice.

Forbes author Caroline Centeno Milton reports that the study, co-authored by researcher Aaron Brough from Utah State University and fellows from another four academic institutions, looked the possible relationship between gender and sustainable decision-making.

The researchers conducted seven experiments involving more than 2,000 participants and found that the environmentally responsible behavior tended to be perceived as more feminine by both those who engaged in it and those who observed it.

Such “feminine” behavior was supposedly seen as a threat to the masculinity of a significant enough number of the male participants to lead the researchers into suggesting gender stereotypes and their effects spread to things like environmentally responsible or irresponsible behavior.

In one of the experiments, for example, the participants had to recall an experience in which they’d done something positive or negative for the environment. The ones that recalled a pro-environment experience rated themselves as more ‘feminine” than the ones that recalled an anti-environment experience.

What’s more, male participants seemed more concerned with the maintenance of their masculine identity, which could also explain the not-too-environmentally good choices they made in the experiments.

The results were apparently consistent across the experiments, leading the authors to conclude gender identity was a factor in behavior that could influence the sustainability of choices we make regardless, it seems, of what area we make this choices in.

The authors have called what they’ve observed the Green-Feminine Stereotype. In the abstract to their study, originally published in 2016, they note “evidence that the concepts of greenness and femininity are cognitively linked and shows that, accordingly, consumers who engage in green behaviors are stereotyped by others as more feminine and even perceive themselves as more feminine.”

By Irina Slav for Oilprice.com

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  • John Green on April 11 2019 said:
    An absurd study. Did someone actually waste resources on this thing, or was it done by some jackoff on their free time?

    Not a single instance of a specific action taken in support of or against the environment by either "feminine" or "masculine" parties.

    Also, the ones that recalled a pro-environment action rated themselves as more "feminine" than the ones that recalled an anti-environment instance... How does that work, did they ask "how feminine are you" and expect a 0% - 100% answer?
  • Justin Nobles on April 04 2019 said:
    Women are trying to become more dominant as well so men are trying to compensate by trying to act more masculine to attract women. Because guess what? Women are attracted to masculine men.
  • Justin Nobles on April 04 2019 said:
    While this might be true, men are often less emotional than women. So one could also infer that less emotional people are less environometally friendly. Like the sociopaths that run capitalist corporations. Did they take that into consideration in the study? Maybe they shouldn't have been asked how feminine they are, but how emotional they are and then their would not be a gender bias, but a psychological one. Furthermore, why not do a study with just men and women seperate and ask them how emotional they were and their environmental friendliness. Typical women trying to push feminism, like Hollywood and the democrats. And no, I am not affilated with any party. I choose not to participate in that farce.
  • Mike on April 04 2019 said:
    The article on Toxic Masculinity is absurd. Nice way to bring identification politics where it doesnâ??t belong.

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