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Study of Wave Power as a Renewable Energy Source

Japan’s 11 March nuclear debacle at Tokyo Electric Power Co.’s Fukushima six reactor complex has renewed Japan’s interest in alternative power sources.

As an energy-poor nation, Tokyo is now re-examining the possibilities of generating electrical power from waves.

While two months ago the Japanese government enacted a law to promote renewable energy sources and require power suppliers to purchase electricity produced by other firms and households using renewable energy, tidal power was not on the list of acceptable renewable energy sources.

Researchers are optimistic but note that development costs are a significant obstacle and there remain many technological hurdles before wave power can be produced on a commercial scale, Kyodo news agency reported.

University of Tokyo Professor and chairman of the Ocean Energy Association-Japan, Takeshi Kinoshita observed that if Japan constructs wave power facilities, "electricity can be delivered to coastal areas after just two years of feasibility testing," who estimated that generating power in waters up to 300 feet deep about 20 miles offshore all around Japan would have about the same electricity generation capacity as 36 nuclear power plants, which could more than effectively halve Japan’s dependence on nuclear power.

By. Joao Peixe, Deputy Editor OilPrice.com



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