• 16 hours PDVSA Booted From Caribbean Terminal Over Unpaid Bills
  • 18 hours Russia Warns Ukraine Against Recovering Oil Off The Coast Of Crimea
  • 20 hours Syrian Rebels Relinquish Control Of Major Gas Field
  • 21 hours Schlumberger Warns Of Moderating Investment In North America
  • 22 hours Oil Prices Set For Weekly Loss As Profit Taking Trumps Mideast Tensions
  • 23 hours Energy Regulators Look To Guard Grid From Cyberattacks
  • 1 day Mexico Says OPEC Has Not Approached It For Deal Extension
  • 1 day New Video Game Targets Oil Infrastructure
  • 1 day Shell Restarts Bonny Light Exports
  • 1 day Russia’s Rosneft To Take Majority In Kurdish Oil Pipeline
  • 1 day Iraq Struggles To Replace Damaged Kirkuk Equipment As Output Falls
  • 2 days British Utility Companies Brace For Major Reforms
  • 2 days Montenegro A ‘Sweet Spot’ Of Untapped Oil, Gas In The Adriatic
  • 2 days Rosneft CEO: Rising U.S. Shale A Downside Risk To Oil Prices
  • 2 days Brazil Could Invite More Bids For Unsold Pre-Salt Oil Blocks
  • 2 days OPEC/Non-OPEC Seek Consensus On Deal Before Nov Summit
  • 2 days London Stock Exchange Boss Defends Push To Win Aramco IPO
  • 2 days Rosneft Signs $400M Deal With Kurdistan
  • 2 days Kinder Morgan Warns About Trans Mountain Delays
  • 2 days India, China, U.S., Complain Of Venezuelan Crude Oil Quality Issues
  • 3 days Kurdish Kirkuk-Ceyhan Crude Oil Flows Plunge To 225,000 Bpd
  • 3 days Russia, Saudis Team Up To Boost Fracking Tech
  • 3 days Conflicting News Spurs Doubt On Aramco IPO
  • 3 days Exxon Starts Production At New Refinery In Texas
  • 3 days Iraq Asks BP To Redevelop Kirkuk Oil Fields
  • 4 days Oil Prices Rise After U.S. API Reports Strong Crude Inventory Draw
  • 4 days Oil Gains Spur Growth In Canada’s Oil Cities
  • 4 days China To Take 5% Of Rosneft’s Output In New Deal
  • 4 days UAE Oil Giant Seeks Partnership For Possible IPO
  • 4 days Planting Trees Could Cut Emissions As Much As Quitting Oil
  • 4 days VW Fails To Secure Critical Commodity For EVs
  • 4 days Enbridge Pipeline Expansion Finally Approved
  • 4 days Iraqi Forces Seize Control Of North Oil Co Fields In Kirkuk
  • 4 days OPEC Oil Deal Compliance Falls To 86%
  • 5 days U.S. Oil Production To Increase in November As Rig Count Falls
  • 5 days Gazprom Neft Unhappy With OPEC-Russia Production Cut Deal
  • 5 days Disputed Venezuelan Vote Could Lead To More Sanctions, Clashes
  • 5 days EU Urges U.S. Congress To Protect Iran Nuclear Deal
  • 5 days Oil Rig Explosion In Louisiana Leaves 7 Injured, 1 Still Missing
  • 5 days Aramco Says No Plans To Shelve IPO
Why Petrol Powered Cars Aren’t Going Anywhere

Why Petrol Powered Cars Aren’t Going Anywhere

Internal combustion engines are still…

The End Of The Oil Majors?

The End Of The Oil Majors?

There appears to be a…

Shale-Related Seismic Activity Rises In Texas, Report

Texas Oil

Oklahoma is the state that springs to mind whenever earthquakes and oil are mentioned in the same sentence, but a fresh report from the Academy of Medicine, Engineering and Science of Texas has revealed that the shale oil industry’s activity in the Lone Star State has led to changes in seismic activity.

The report found that while between 1975 and 2008 the average number of quakes above a magnitude of 3 was one or two, between 2008 and 2016 it increased to 12 to 15 a year. The TAMEST task force that authored the report noted that this increase has been linked not to fracking itself, however, but to wastewater disposal wells, which is in line with findings from other studies.

As to whether contaminated water from these disposal wells could seep through into subsoil aquifers that may supply drinking water, the report found that this is highly unlikely, adding, however, that more research was necessary to quench public concern about this potential problem.

The other commonly cited problem with shale oil and gas—greenhouse gas emissions—is naturally present here as well, although the authors of the report note the beneficial effects of state and federal regulation targeting these emissions.

One other serious problem identified by the TAMEST task force had to do with road infrastructure and the number of accidents resulting from the major increase in traffic due to the shale boom across the state. The development of one well in the Permian, for example, needs 997 trucks in all. For the Eagle Ford, the total required is 1,708. Most existing roads in Texas were not built with the shale industry in mind, and they are now suffering the wear and tear from this heavy traffic. As a logical consequence of this heavy traffic, accidents have increased in frequency and severity.

Generally, shale oil and gas development has been good for Texas economically. It has also, in some ways, at least, been better for the environment than conventional oil. The authors said, “The vast number of new wells drilled in shale formations in Texas since 2007 have had substantial spatial impacts on the landscape. However, horizontal wells have a smaller impact than the equivalent number of vertical wells would have had. When operators use a single well pad for multiple wells, surface impacts are significantly reduced.”

For now, it seems that the good that comes from oil and gas production in the Anadarko Basin, Eagle Ford, the Permian, the Barnett, and the Haynesville shale plays outweighs the bad. The industry employs more than half a million people and contributes tens of billions to the state coffers.

By Irina Slav for Oilprice.com

More Top Reads From Oilprice.com:



Join the discussion | Back to homepage

Leave a comment

Leave a comment

Oilprice - The No. 1 Source for Oil & Energy News