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Pakistani Civil Servants Banned from Wearing Socks to Work During Energy Crisis

Pakistan has been beset by a chronic energy crisis; the governments advice … stop wearing socks!

Civil servants have been told that they can no longer wear socks to work, in an effort to keep them cool whilst all air conditioning units are switched off and daily temperatures rise to more than 40°C.

Air conditioning in all government buildings is offline in an attempt to reduce the load on the electrical grid, which suffers constant blackouts of up to 20 hours a day.

A spokesman for the government stated that, “there shall be no more use of air-conditioners in public offices till such time that substantial improvement in the energy situation takes place.”

Related article: The US Looks on as Pakistan and Iran Inaugurate Gas Pipeline

Pakistan is a country already suffering from high unemployment, poverty, and a weak economy, and these power shortages, which have crippled some energy intensive industries, costing hundreds of thousands of jobs, have led to violent protests against the government. The power shortage has even led to a falling standard of living as many families are no longer able to pump water.

Ministers Musadiq Malik and Sohail Wajahat Siddiqui, in charge of water and power in Pakistan, have admitted that there is absolutely nothing to be done to end the power cuts, except increase the price of energy.

The Daily Times wrote that, “presenting the realistic picture, the ministers announced that they were going to increase the price of electricity and gas for all sectors.” No precise details were given, except for the fact that the situation will get worse before it starts to get better.

By. James Burgess of Oilprice.com



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