• 3 hours LNG Glut To Continue Into 2020s, IEA Says
  • 5 hours Oil Nears $52 With Record OPEC Deal Compliance
  • 8 hours Saudi Aramco CEO Affirms IPO On Track For H2 2018
  • 10 hours Canadia Ltd. Returns To Sudan For First Time Since Oil Price Crash
  • 12 hours Syrian Rebel Group Takes Over Oil Field From IS
  • 3 days PDVSA Booted From Caribbean Terminal Over Unpaid Bills
  • 3 days Russia Warns Ukraine Against Recovering Oil Off The Coast Of Crimea
  • 3 days Syrian Rebels Relinquish Control Of Major Gas Field
  • 3 days Schlumberger Warns Of Moderating Investment In North America
  • 3 days Oil Prices Set For Weekly Loss As Profit Taking Trumps Mideast Tensions
  • 3 days Energy Regulators Look To Guard Grid From Cyberattacks
  • 3 days Mexico Says OPEC Has Not Approached It For Deal Extension
  • 3 days New Video Game Targets Oil Infrastructure
  • 3 days Shell Restarts Bonny Light Exports
  • 4 days Russia’s Rosneft To Take Majority In Kurdish Oil Pipeline
  • 4 days Iraq Struggles To Replace Damaged Kirkuk Equipment As Output Falls
  • 4 days British Utility Companies Brace For Major Reforms
  • 4 days Montenegro A ‘Sweet Spot’ Of Untapped Oil, Gas In The Adriatic
  • 4 days Rosneft CEO: Rising U.S. Shale A Downside Risk To Oil Prices
  • 4 days Brazil Could Invite More Bids For Unsold Pre-Salt Oil Blocks
  • 4 days OPEC/Non-OPEC Seek Consensus On Deal Before Nov Summit
  • 4 days London Stock Exchange Boss Defends Push To Win Aramco IPO
  • 4 days Rosneft Signs $400M Deal With Kurdistan
  • 4 days Kinder Morgan Warns About Trans Mountain Delays
  • 5 days India, China, U.S., Complain Of Venezuelan Crude Oil Quality Issues
  • 5 days Kurdish Kirkuk-Ceyhan Crude Oil Flows Plunge To 225,000 Bpd
  • 5 days Russia, Saudis Team Up To Boost Fracking Tech
  • 5 days Conflicting News Spurs Doubt On Aramco IPO
  • 5 days Exxon Starts Production At New Refinery In Texas
  • 5 days Iraq Asks BP To Redevelop Kirkuk Oil Fields
  • 6 days Oil Prices Rise After U.S. API Reports Strong Crude Inventory Draw
  • 6 days Oil Gains Spur Growth In Canada’s Oil Cities
  • 6 days China To Take 5% Of Rosneft’s Output In New Deal
  • 6 days UAE Oil Giant Seeks Partnership For Possible IPO
  • 6 days Planting Trees Could Cut Emissions As Much As Quitting Oil
  • 6 days VW Fails To Secure Critical Commodity For EVs
  • 6 days Enbridge Pipeline Expansion Finally Approved
  • 6 days Iraqi Forces Seize Control Of North Oil Co Fields In Kirkuk
  • 6 days OPEC Oil Deal Compliance Falls To 86%
  • 7 days U.S. Oil Production To Increase in November As Rig Count Falls

Breaking News:

LNG Glut To Continue Into 2020s, IEA Says

Ongoing Coal Ash Spill Raises Prospect of Regulation

Ongoing Coal Ash Spill Raises Prospect of Regulation

Duke Energy is continuing to struggle to get a handle on its large leak of coal ash into the Dan River. After four days, workers have managed to slow but not entirely halt the steady flow of toxic coal waste, which has totaled an estimated 50,000 to 82,000 tons. The breach occurred at a retired coal plant site, where coal ash is stored in a man-made lake surrounded by earthen walls. Images of black slurry in the Dan River and the inability to quickly plug the leak has fueled speculation that federal regulation will be required to control coal ash, which is commonly stored at similar sites around the country.

Coal ash is the left over slurry after burning coal in power plants, and it holds toxic contaminants like lead, mercury, and arsenic. The spill came only a few days after a court ruled that the Environmental Protection Agency must publish a final rule on the regulation of coal ash by December 19, 2014. EPA began looking at coal ash after a catastrophic failure of a dam in Tennessee leaked a billion gallons of coal ash to neighboring communities in 2008. EPA proposed regulations in 2010 but has seemingly dragged its feet to finalize them after protest from the coal industry, but a lawsuit by environmental groups has forced its hand.

Related article: Coal Industry in Structural Decline

Up until now, coal ash has been exempted from being categorized as a hazardous waste, giving coal companies freer rein over how to handle the waste, which is often recycled into products like cement or drywall. Regulation has been left to the states due to the lack of federal standards, and in many states, such as North Carolina, the state government provides only lax enforcement. The tragedy on the Dan River will put much greater pressure on EPA to tighten the screws at the federal level.

By. Charles Kennedy of Oilprice.com



Join the discussion | Back to homepage

Leave a comment

Leave a comment

Oilprice - The No. 1 Source for Oil & Energy News