• 5 minutes Desperate Call or... Erdogan Says Turkey Will Boycott U.S. Electronics
  • 11 minutes Saudi Fund Wants to Take Tesla Private?
  • 17 minutes Starvation, horror in Venezuela
  • 16 mins WTI @ 67.50, charts show $62.50 next
  • 5 hours Mike Shellman's musings on "Cartoon of the Week"
  • 23 mins Newspaper Editorials Across U.S. Rebuke Trump For Attacks On Press
  • 2 hours WTI @ 69.33 headed for $70s - $80s end of August
  • 4 hours Venezuela set to raise gasoline prices to international levels.
  • 4 hours Renewable Energy Could "Effectively Be Free" by 2030
  • 5 hours Scottish Battery ‘Breakthrough’ Could Charge Electric Cars In Seconds
  • 3 hours Corporations Are Buying More Renewables Than Ever
  • 36 mins Batteries Could Be a Small Dotcom-Style Bubble
  • 19 hours Oil prices---Tug of War: Sanctions vs. Trade War
  • 18 hours California Solar Mandate Based on False Facts
  • 8 hours Again Google: Brazil May Probe Google Over Its Cell Phone System
  • 8 hours Don't Expect Too Much: Despite a Soaring Economy, America's Annual Pay Increase Isn't Budging
Oil Prices Fall Despite Supply Fears

Oil Prices Fall Despite Supply Fears

Oil prices started the day…

Iran’s Latest Tactic To Save Market Share

Iran’s Latest Tactic To Save Market Share

Iran cut oil prices for…

OTE Corp to Build Two OTEC Plants and an Eco-Industrial Park in the Bahamas

Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) describes a source of renewable energy that is growing in popularity amongst tropical island nations. Warm seawater from the surface is run through a heat converter, to turn a chemical with a low boiling point, such as ammonia, into steam which then turns a turbine to generate electricity. Cold seawater is then pumped from over a kilometre deep and used to chill the steamed ammonia.

The Bahamas have recently signed an agreement with a Pennsylvanian company, OTE Corporation, to build two 10 megawatt plants. Interestingly, OTE Corp. plan to pump far more cold water than necessary to their land based plants so that it can be used for water desalination or to grow commodities that prefer cooler climates.

The cold seawater will be pumped through a pipe eight feet in diameter and sent to an eco-industrial park for producing fresh water, mariculture (the cultivation of marine organisms for food and other products), aquaculture, and to help cool temperate greenhouses.

OTE Corporation also has projects lined up in the Virgin Islands, the Cayman Islands, Puerto Rico, and the Tanzanian island of Zanzibar.

Lockhead Martin is another company developing OTEC power plants. There plants are ocean based, unlike those of OTE corp. and also will only focus on producing electricity. They have plans to build a 10 megawatt plant soon, with the hope of a 100 megawatt plant in the future. Gary Feldman, the director of business development for new business ventures at Lockhead Martin, said that, “it’s a very scalable technology. This is a very exciting time for OTEC.”

By. Joao Piexe of Oilprice.com



Join the discussion | Back to homepage

Leave a comment

Leave a comment

Oilprice - The No. 1 Source for Oil & Energy News