• 4 minutes USGS Announces Largest Continuous Oil Assessment in Texas and New Mexico
  • 7 minutes Could Tesla Buy GM?
  • 13 minutes Global Economy-Bad Days Are coming
  • 16 minutes Venezuela continues to sink in misery
  • 12 hours Paris Is Burning Over Climate Change Taxes -- Is America Next?
  • 2 hours What will the future hold for nations dependent on high oil prices.
  • 1 min OPEC Cuts Deep to Save Cartel
  • 55 mins Congrats: 4 journalists and a newspaper are Time’s Person of the Year
  • 21 hours End of EV Subsidies?
  • 1 hour How High Can Oil Prices Rise? (Part 2 of my previous thread)
  • 6 hours Price Decline in Chinese Solar Panels
  • 11 hours Permian Suicide
  • 17 hours GOODBYE FOREIGN OIL DEPENDENCE!!
  • 16 hours Asian stocks down
  • 20 hours Maersk's COO statment.
  • 19 hours Trump accuses Google Of Hiding 'Fair Media' Coverage of him
OPEC+ Deal To Be Forged In March

OPEC+ Deal To Be Forged In March

OPEC and its Non-OPEC partners…

Iran Threatens To Close Key Oil Choke Point

Iran Threatens To Close Key Oil Choke Point

With a U.S. aircraft carrier…

Nigerian Villagers Take Shell to Court over Pollution of Niger Delta

In a landmark case which could open up the doors to allow more poor communities to file compensation claims against international oil companies, on Thursday four Nigerian villagers took Royal Dutch Shell to court.

The fishermen and farmers claim that Shell has polluted land and waters in the Niger Delta to such an extent that nothing now grows.

Shell claims that it cannot be held responsible for the leaks because they were caused by sabotage to the pipes, as local thieves tried to steal the oil flowing within. Shell actually claims that their job of attempting to clean up the spills is now over, despite the fact that the environment remains polluted.

Related Article: Shell to Build the World's First Ever Floating LNG Plant

This case is special because the plaintiffs have decided not to sue the company contracted to operate the pipelines in their country, but rather they are directly suing the parent company in their home country; in this case Royal Dutch Shell in Amsterdam.

Geert Ritsema, the international affairs coordinator at Friends of the Earth, commented that the case “opens up a range of possibilities for people from poor countries to use the legal system to seek compensation from companies,"

By. Joao Peixe of Oilprice.com



Join the discussion | Back to homepage

Leave a comment

Leave a comment

Oilprice - The No. 1 Source for Oil & Energy News
-->