• 5 minutes Malaysia's Petronas vs. Sarawak Court Case - Will It End Up In London Courts?
  • 9 minutes Sell out now or hold on?
  • 16 minutes Oil prices going down
  • 22 mins Oil prices going down
  • 13 hours After Three Decade Macedonia End Dispute With Greece, new name: the Republic of Northern Macedonia
  • 2 hours Sell out now or hold on?
  • 3 hours Malaysia's Petronas vs. Sarawak Court Case - Will It End Up In London Courts?
  • 7 mins Oil and Trade War
  • 12 hours Two Koreas Agree To March Together At Asian Games
  • 4 hours When will oil demand start declining due to EVs?
  • 3 hours What If Canada Had Wind and Not Oilsands?
  • 2 hours Russia and Saudi Arabia to have a chat on oil during FIFA World Cup - report
  • 4 hours Correlation Between Oil Sweet Spots and Real Estate Hot Spots
  • 3 hours venezuala oil crisis
  • 2 hours Trump Hits China With Tariffs On $50 Billion Of Goods
  • 12 hours Geopolitical and Political Risks make their strong comeback to global oil and gas markets
  • 25 mins Germany Orders Daimler to Recall 774,000 Diesel Cars in Europe
  • 22 hours No LNG Pipelines? Let the Trucks Roll In
  • 22 hours China & India in talks to form anti-OPEC

Breaking News:

Egypt Raises Fuel Prices By Up To 50%

Oil Demand Growth Could Start To Soften Soon

Oil Demand Growth Could Start To Soften Soon

Non-OECD markets are one of…

China Plans To Create A $78 Billion Natural Gas Giant

China Plans To Create A $78 Billion Natural Gas Giant

Chinese regulators are looking to…

New EPA Rules Could See the West's Largest Coal Power Plant Shut Down by 2017

The Environmental Protection Agency has proposed a new plan to clean the air in the national parks of Arizona; a move that could force the largest coal-fired power plant in the West out of business.

Owners of the plant fear that the proposal could push them into an unprofitable situation which would force a shutdown of the plant as soon as 2017.

George Hardeen, a spokesman for the plant, has admitted that “the critical issue is the timing of it. If the EPA requires it to be done within a short period of time, it becomes economically non-viable.”

The plant burns eight million tonnes of coal a year, and provides power to Arizona, Nevada, and California, as well as most of the power used in the Central Arizona Project, which supplies water to Phoenix.

The new EPA rules will require the installation of new pollution controls which are estimated to cost $1.1 billion. The owners of the plant say that it would be financially non beneficial to invest such a large sum when their lease for the land of the plant expires in 2019, and as of yet no deal has been agreed for an extension. Without a guarantee of that lease extension the money will not be invested and the plant will be closed.

Hardeen explained that, “you'd be putting a big expense out and not know if you'll be getting that expense back over time.”

By. Charles Kennedy of Oilprice.com


x

Join the discussion | Back to homepage

Leave a comment
  • dralston on July 26 2012 said:
    Is there some reason not to mention the name of the power plant or the location? George Hardeen must be the spokesman for ??

Leave a comment

Oilprice - The No. 1 Source for Oil & Energy News