• 5 minutes Trump vs. MbS
  • 9 minutes Saudis Threaten Retaliation If Sanctions are Imposed
  • 15 minutes Can the World Survive without Saudi Oil?
  • 22 mins WTI @ $75.75, headed for $64 - 67
  • 5 hours Petrol versus EV
  • 3 hours EU to Splash Billions on Battery Factories
  • 7 hours The Dirt on Clean Electric Cars
  • 20 hours The end of "King Coal" in the Wales
  • 21 hours These are the world’s most competitive economies: US No. 1
  • 21 hours Saudi-Kuwaiti Talks on Shared Oil Stall Over Chevron
  • 33 mins OPEC Is Struggling To Deliver On Increased Output Pledge
  • 19 hours Closing the circle around Saudi Arabia: Where did Khashoggi disappear?
  • 15 mins U.N. About Climate Change: World Must Take 'Unprecedented' Steps To Avert Worst Effects
  • 10 hours E-mopeds
  • 2 hours 10 Incredible Facts about U.S. LNG
  • 1 day Poland signs 20-year deal on U.S. LNG supplies
  • 20 hours Coal remains a major source of power in Europe.
Indicators To Watch As Oil Stocks Flop

Indicators To Watch As Oil Stocks Flop

Stock markets derailed on Wednesday,…

Why Is This Little-Known Element Up Over 300%

Why Is This Little-Known Element Up Over 300%

Element ‘’V’’, better known as…

MIT Creates World’s Thinnest Solar Cell, Just 1 Nanometre Thick

The trend in solar cell research at the moment is aimed at increasing the conversion efficiency, resulting in most solar cells now able to convert 15 -20 percent of the solar energy they receive into electricity, and the most efficient modules operating at 30 percent efficiency.

Researchers at MIT, however, have been taking a different route in their research. They have been working on making the solar cells far thinner, and with fewer materials. In a paper titled “Extraordinary Sunlight Absorption and 1 nm-Thick Photovoltaics using Two-Dimensional Monolayer Materials” they described how they have managed to develop a technique for creating solar cells that are only two molecules thick (the thinnest solar cells possible).

Jeffrey Grossman, the Carl Richard Soderberg Associate Professor of Power Engineering at MIT, who authored the paper along with Marco Bernardi, a postdoc in MIT’s Department of Materials Science, and Maurizia Palummo, a senior researcher visiting MIT from the University of Rome, explained that they used nanotechnology to place a one-molecule thick layer of grapheme on top of a one-molecule thick layer of molybdenum disulphide, creating a solar cell that is just one nanometre thick. Admittedly the resulting solar cell can only offer a conversion efficiency of 1-2 percent, but by placing multiple cells one on top of the other the overall generation capacity can be far greater than conventional cells; as much as 1,000 times more energy per pound than normal.

Related Article: The Evolving Efficiency of Photovoltaic Solar Panels

MIT’s Stack of Two One Molecule Thick Solar Cell Materials.
The MIT team found that an effective solar cell could be made from a stack of two one-molecule-thick materials: Graphene (a one-atom-thick sheet of carbon atoms, shown at bottom in blue) and molybdenum disulphide (above, with molybdenum atoms shown in red and sulphur in yellow). The two sheets together are thousands of times thinner than conventional silicon solar cells. (MIT News)

In order to provide a comparison, ThinkProgress noted that Alta Devices are also developing an ultra-thin solar cell, and whilst their product does work at 30% efficiency, it is 1,000 times thicker than MIT’s cell, at one micrometre. And whereas the MIT cell will be cheap to produce, Alta Devices is expensive due to the use of purified silicon.

Related Article: Buffett Goes After 2nd Solar Farm Bond

Fearing that the incredibly thin nature of the solar cell will make it delicate and vulnerable to breaking, is not unreasonable, but amazingly the cells should be strong, able to withstand heat, moisture, and wind, all without the need of the traditional glass protection.

The problem with MIT’s design is that it is just that. A design and nothing more. They have run all computer modelling simulations, but have yet to actually produce a physical sample. And with the lack of large-scale techniques for producing molybdenum disulphide, manufacturing the cells in any volume is still impossible.

By. Joao Peixe of Oilprice.com


x

Join the discussion | Back to homepage

Leave a comment

Leave a comment

Oilprice - The No. 1 Source for Oil & Energy News