• 18 hours PDVSA Booted From Caribbean Terminal Over Unpaid Bills
  • 20 hours Russia Warns Ukraine Against Recovering Oil Off The Coast Of Crimea
  • 22 hours Syrian Rebels Relinquish Control Of Major Gas Field
  • 23 hours Schlumberger Warns Of Moderating Investment In North America
  • 1 day Oil Prices Set For Weekly Loss As Profit Taking Trumps Mideast Tensions
  • 1 day Energy Regulators Look To Guard Grid From Cyberattacks
  • 1 day Mexico Says OPEC Has Not Approached It For Deal Extension
  • 1 day New Video Game Targets Oil Infrastructure
  • 1 day Shell Restarts Bonny Light Exports
  • 1 day Russia’s Rosneft To Take Majority In Kurdish Oil Pipeline
  • 2 days Iraq Struggles To Replace Damaged Kirkuk Equipment As Output Falls
  • 2 days British Utility Companies Brace For Major Reforms
  • 2 days Montenegro A ‘Sweet Spot’ Of Untapped Oil, Gas In The Adriatic
  • 2 days Rosneft CEO: Rising U.S. Shale A Downside Risk To Oil Prices
  • 2 days Brazil Could Invite More Bids For Unsold Pre-Salt Oil Blocks
  • 2 days OPEC/Non-OPEC Seek Consensus On Deal Before Nov Summit
  • 2 days London Stock Exchange Boss Defends Push To Win Aramco IPO
  • 2 days Rosneft Signs $400M Deal With Kurdistan
  • 2 days Kinder Morgan Warns About Trans Mountain Delays
  • 3 days India, China, U.S., Complain Of Venezuelan Crude Oil Quality Issues
  • 3 days Kurdish Kirkuk-Ceyhan Crude Oil Flows Plunge To 225,000 Bpd
  • 3 days Russia, Saudis Team Up To Boost Fracking Tech
  • 3 days Conflicting News Spurs Doubt On Aramco IPO
  • 3 days Exxon Starts Production At New Refinery In Texas
  • 3 days Iraq Asks BP To Redevelop Kirkuk Oil Fields
  • 4 days Oil Prices Rise After U.S. API Reports Strong Crude Inventory Draw
  • 4 days Oil Gains Spur Growth In Canada’s Oil Cities
  • 4 days China To Take 5% Of Rosneft’s Output In New Deal
  • 4 days UAE Oil Giant Seeks Partnership For Possible IPO
  • 4 days Planting Trees Could Cut Emissions As Much As Quitting Oil
  • 4 days VW Fails To Secure Critical Commodity For EVs
  • 4 days Enbridge Pipeline Expansion Finally Approved
  • 4 days Iraqi Forces Seize Control Of North Oil Co Fields In Kirkuk
  • 4 days OPEC Oil Deal Compliance Falls To 86%
  • 5 days U.S. Oil Production To Increase in November As Rig Count Falls
  • 5 days Gazprom Neft Unhappy With OPEC-Russia Production Cut Deal
  • 5 days Disputed Venezuelan Vote Could Lead To More Sanctions, Clashes
  • 5 days EU Urges U.S. Congress To Protect Iran Nuclear Deal
  • 5 days Oil Rig Explosion In Louisiana Leaves 7 Injured, 1 Still Missing
  • 5 days Aramco Says No Plans To Shelve IPO

MIT Accidently Discovers Technique to Generate Energy from Condensation

MIT Accidently Discovers Technique to Generate Energy from Condensation

A recent report, published in the journal Nature Communications by MIT postdoc Nenad Miljkovic, details the completely unexpected phenomenon discovered by MIT researchers that tiny water droplets which form on a superhydrophobic surface and then jump away from the surface, actually carry an electrical charge.

They believe that further research and experimentation could lead to the development of a new way of drawing power from the atmosphere itself.

Miljkovic explained that in previous experiments the team had found that under certain conditions the water droplets forming on the superhydrophobic surface due to simple condensation was jumping away rather than just sliding down the surface due to gravity.

Droplets jumping off a superhydrophobic surface
Droplets jumping off a superhydrophobic surface. (MIT News)

They then performed more tests, and “found that when these droplets jump, through analysis of high-speed video, we saw that they repel one another mid-flight. Previous studies have shown no such effect. When we first saw that, we were intrigued.”

Related article: Renewable Power in Germany Gets Boost from Merkel’s Re-election

The researchers then designed a series of experiments that would test the reasons for why the droplets were repelling each other after they had left the surface. By using a charged electrode they found that a positive charge would repel the droplets, and cause them to repel each other, and that a negatively charged electrode would attract the droplets. This allowed them to surmise that the droplets created a net positive electrical charge when they left the surface.

Jonathan Boreyko, a postdoc at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, said that “the fact that the jumping droplets exhibit a net charge was completely unknown until this report … It is my impression that this work is of very high quality and will have a large impact on the rapidly evolving field of phase-change heat transfer on nanostructured surfaces.”

Miljkovic hopes that by positioning two metal plates in parallel, and using one plate to form the drops and have them jump off it and the other plate receiving the droplets, you could generate a small amount of power from the natural condensation in the ambient air. She explained that “you just need a cold surface in a moist environment. We’re working on demonstrating this concept.”

By. Joao Peixe of Oilprice.com



Join the discussion | Back to homepage

Leave a comment

Leave a comment

Oilprice - The No. 1 Source for Oil & Energy News