• 5 minutes Desperate Call or... Erdogan Says Turkey Will Boycott U.S. Electronics
  • 11 minutes Don't Expect Too Much: Despite a Soaring Economy, America's Annual Pay Increase Isn't Budging
  • 15 minutes WTI @ 67.50, charts show $62.50 next
  • 2 hours Starvation, horror in Venezuela
  • 2 mins Mike Shellman's musings on "Cartoon of the Week"
  • 2 hours Again Google: Brazil May Probe Google Over Its Cell Phone System
  • 17 hours Tesla Faces 3 Lawsuits Over “Funding Secured” Tweet
  • 4 hours Batteries Could Be a Small Dotcom-Style Bubble
  • 17 mins Renewable Energy Could "Effectively Be Free" by 2030
  • 21 hours Why hydrogen economics does not work
  • 10 hours Saudi Fund Wants to Take Tesla Private?
  • 1 day The EU Loses The Principles On Which It Was Built
  • 13 hours California Solar Mandate Based on False Facts
  • 1 hour WTI @ 69.33 headed for $70s - $80s end of August
  • 1 day WSJ *still* refuses to acknowledge U.S. Shale Oil industry's horrible economics and debts
  • 13 hours Oil prices---Tug of War: Sanctions vs. Trade War
Can China Afford To Slap Tariffs On U.S. Oil?

Can China Afford To Slap Tariffs On U.S. Oil?

China’s latest round of tariffs…

Kinder Morgan Gets Green Light On Part Of Trans Mountain Pipeline

Transmountain Pipeline

Canada’s National Energy Board has given Kinder Morgan the go-ahead to start construction work on a tunnel entrance in British Columbia’s Burnaby Mountain that will be part of the Trans Mountain oil pipeline expansion. The board also approved the expanded pipeline’s route in the part where the tunnel is to be built, lifting all pre-construction conditions regarding the tunnel specifically.

Though this is a rare piece of good news for Kinder Morgan in the Trans Mountain saga, it does not mean that the pipeline construction will soon begin. The NEB has yet to approve about half of the pipeline’s route, and there are also other permits to collect and lawsuits to see the end of.

Of course, there is also the fierce government opposition to the pipeline project in British Columbia that sparked a sort of trade war with Alberta. The B.C. government pledged to fight the project on all fronts, prompting Kinder Morgan’s president to react. Earlier this month, in a letter to John Horgan, the province’s PM, Ian Anderson said the motives that B.C. has given for its opposition to the expansion project were questionable, adding that new rules for oil shipments proposed by the government last week were in conflict with already completed reviews.

Related: Big Batteries Are Becoming Much Cheaper

At the end of January, the environmental ministry of British Columbia devised new rules for oil spill preparedness and response. As part of their journey from proposal to regulation, the ministry will set up a scientific advisory panel to look into whether a diluted bitumen spill in the water could be cleaned up. While the panel pursues this matter, the ministry has proposed a ban on any increase in heavy crude shipments.

The US$5.95-billion expansion project has been approved by the federal government and PM Justin Trudeau reiterated Ottawa’s support for it. Canada’s oil producers in Alberta are struggling to get their crude to the market using costlier—and riskier—railway transport because of the looming shortage of pipeline capacity.

By Irina Slav for Oilprice.com

More Top Reads From Oilprice.com:



Join the discussion | Back to homepage

Leave a comment

Leave a comment

Oilprice - The No. 1 Source for Oil & Energy News