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Japan May Quit Nuclear Power by the 2030s

A new energy strategy will be unveiled soon in Japan to determine the future of its nuclear industry. Three options are being considered; zero nuclear energy as soon as possible, 15% nuclear energy by 2030, and 20-25% nuclear energy by 2030. The latest polls suggest that the majority of people want to exit nuclear power as soon as possible.

This would be a big change in direction from the 2010 plan to boost Japan’s nuclear energy to provide more than 50% of its energy demand by 2030.

Prime Minister Yoshihiko Noda will decide on the new strategy this week, and admitted that one of the options he is considering is a proposal by his Democratic Party for Japan, to “invest all possible policy resources to make it possible to exit nuclear power in the 2030s.”

Although with the Democrats likely to lose in the upcoming elections in a few months, it is unknown whether any decision Noda makes will be carried out by the new government.

Japan’s business lobbies fear that abandoning nuclear energy will drive energy costs up and push companies abroad, whereas antinuclear protestors believe that abandoning nuclear will create new business opportunities in areas such as renewable energy and energy efficiency.

By. James Burgess of Oilprice.com



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