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Are Natural Gas Prices About To Break Out?

Are Natural Gas Prices About To Break Out?

Natural gas inventories are low…

Indonesia, Former OPEC Member Considers Nuclear Risks

Indonesian Foreign Minister Marty M. Natalegawa had some trenchant observations to share during a recent ministerial meeting on "Fortifying Nuclear Safety and Security" at the UN in New York.

Indonesia has a unique perspective on all aspects of power resources, as even though it had begun producing oil in the early 20th century, nevertheless saw its production slide so much that it left OPEC in 2008, a decline that many supporters of the Hubbert “peak oil” theory have used to advance their argument.

Natalegawa told fellow ministers during the meeting, "It is true that every state has the right to utilize nuclear energy for peaceful purposes. However, the safety principle must continue to become the priority and absolute international cooperation must be done. We must avoid accidents and negative consequences from energy utilization, for that cooperation is a necessity. International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) needs to embrace international agencies, such as the World Health Organization, the Food and Agriculture Organization and the World Meteorological Organization as well as other stakeholders. Development in networking and synergy is the key.  " Antara news agency reported.
 
Referring to Japan’s dolorous experience from its 11 March Fukushima nuclear catastrophe Natalegawa concluded, “The Association of Southeast Asian Nations and Japan will reinforce cooperation of exchange in experiences, training and communication reinforcement during a hazard.”

By. Joao Peixe, Deputy Editor OilPrice.com



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