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Greenpeace Pirates Refused Bail in Russia

Greenpeace Pirates Refused Bail in Russia

A court in Murmansk, Russia, continues to discuss the fate of the 30 Greenpeace activists arrested during a protest against Arctic drilling.

Three of the 30 have already been refused bail. Denis Sinyakov, a photographer, was considered a flight risk due to his frequent trips abroad, and has been remanded in custody for two months, as have Roman Dolgov, an expert on marine pollution, and Paul Ruzycki, a Canadian national. The other activists are expected to receive their verdicts on Thursday afternoon.

Denis Sinyakov
Denis Sinyakov. (The Guardian)

The activists, who were on board the Greenpeace boat the Arctic Sunrise, were protesting drilling operations in Arctic waters at the Prirazlomnaya drilling platform, operated by natural gas giant Gazprom.

Related article: Russian Special Forces Storm Greenpeace Ship in the Arctic

Two of the Greenpeace activists attempted to climb on to the rig and try and stop it from working, a protest against the drilling, which they claim is high risk to the Arctic environment.

The Russians have accused the activists of piracy, an offence that carries a maximum of 15 years in jail. Greenpeace claim that the charges are absurd, that their boat was outside Russia’s territory and in international waters, posing no threat to the rig. They claim that they have a long history of nonviolent protests, and that there was never any intent of piracy or acts of terrorism from their members.

The Investigative Committee of Russia has already found everyone arrested from the boat guilty of attempting to storm the drilling platform and seize control.

Russian President Vladimir Putin, confessed that it was obvious that the Greenpeace activists were not pirates, but that “formally they were trying to seize this platform. It is evident that those people violated international law.” Still the prosecutors are continuing with their charges of piracy despite what the president stated.

By. Joao Peixe of Oilprice.com



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  • Judith on September 29 2013 said:
    How can "the Russians have accused the activists of piracy" when it was the Russians who helicoptered onto the Greenpeace boat and held the crew hostage? This poor planet is being divied up among Russia, China, and the USA. God save us all from their unlimited greed and ruthlessness to satisfy it.
  • Jon Cloke on September 27 2013 said:
    Fantastic - more surreal legalese from Ozymandias Putin and his judicial team of Vyshinskys, as he carefully reinforces his dictatorship under the pretense of adhering to the rule of law.

    So apparently, sending the FSB to murder opponents in London through the administration of Polonium is good, but protesting oil exploration is piracy - who knew?

    Or, the Pussy Riot Extravaganza, the Litvinenko assassination and now the Greenpeace 'pirates' are The Boss's way of telling the world "I can get you anywhere you are with absolute impunity.."

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