• 1 hour Iraq Struggles To Replace Damaged Kirkuk Equipment As Output Falls
  • 6 hours British Utility Companies Brace For Major Reforms
  • 10 hours Montenegro A ‘Sweet Spot’ Of Untapped Oil, Gas In The Adriatic
  • 12 hours Rosneft CEO: Rising U.S. Shale A Downside Risk To Oil Prices
  • 13 hours Brazil Could Invite More Bids For Unsold Pre-Salt Oil Blocks
  • 14 hours OPEC/Non-OPEC Seek Consensus On Deal Before Nov Summit
  • 15 hours London Stock Exchange Boss Defends Push To Win Aramco IPO
  • 16 hours Rosneft Signs $400M Deal With Kurdistan
  • 19 hours Kinder Morgan Warns About Trans Mountain Delays
  • 1 day India, China, U.S., Complain Of Venezuelan Crude Oil Quality Issues
  • 1 day Kurdish Kirkuk-Ceyhan Crude Oil Flows Plunge To 225,000 Bpd
  • 1 day Russia, Saudis Team Up To Boost Fracking Tech
  • 2 days Conflicting News Spurs Doubt On Aramco IPO
  • 2 days Exxon Starts Production At New Refinery In Texas
  • 2 days Iraq Asks BP To Redevelop Kirkuk Oil Fields
  • 3 days Oil Prices Rise After U.S. API Reports Strong Crude Inventory Draw
  • 3 days Oil Gains Spur Growth In Canada’s Oil Cities
  • 3 days China To Take 5% Of Rosneft’s Output In New Deal
  • 3 days UAE Oil Giant Seeks Partnership For Possible IPO
  • 3 days Planting Trees Could Cut Emissions As Much As Quitting Oil
  • 3 days VW Fails To Secure Critical Commodity For EVs
  • 3 days Enbridge Pipeline Expansion Finally Approved
  • 3 days Iraqi Forces Seize Control Of North Oil Co Fields In Kirkuk
  • 3 days OPEC Oil Deal Compliance Falls To 86%
  • 3 days U.S. Oil Production To Increase in November As Rig Count Falls
  • 4 days Gazprom Neft Unhappy With OPEC-Russia Production Cut Deal
  • 4 days Disputed Venezuelan Vote Could Lead To More Sanctions, Clashes
  • 4 days EU Urges U.S. Congress To Protect Iran Nuclear Deal
  • 4 days Oil Rig Explosion In Louisiana Leaves 7 Injured, 1 Still Missing
  • 4 days Aramco Says No Plans To Shelve IPO
  • 6 days Trump Passes Iran Nuclear Deal Back to Congress
  • 6 days Texas Shutters More Coal-Fired Plants
  • 7 days Oil Trading Firm Expects Unprecedented U.S. Crude Exports
  • 7 days UK’s FCA Met With Aramco Prior To Proposing Listing Rule Change
  • 7 days Chevron Quits Australian Deepwater Oil Exploration
  • 7 days Europe Braces For End Of Iran Nuclear Deal
  • 7 days Renewable Energy Startup Powering Native American Protest Camp
  • 7 days Husky Energy Set To Restart Pipeline
  • 7 days Russia, Morocco Sign String Of Energy And Military Deals
  • 8 days Norway Looks To Cut Some Of Its Generous Tax Breaks For EVs
How To Play The Next Wireless Revolution

How To Play The Next Wireless Revolution

The global communications boom has…

5 Players To Watch In The FinTech Revolution

5 Players To Watch In The FinTech Revolution

Artificial Intelligence and Blockchain tech…

Gas Leaks Cause Methane Buildup in Southwest U.S.

Shale gas well

The U.S. Southwest has become the location of a significant buildup of methane, a popular greenhouse gas, and the buildup was caused by natural gas leaks, scientists studying the phenomenon have concluded.

The leaks are coming from wells, storage facilities, pipelines and processing plants located across Arizona, New Mexico, Colorado, and Utah. A few leaks have come from untapped deposits, naturally seeping into the air. However, according to the scientists, from NASA’s Jet Propulsion Lab and Caltech, as much as two-thirds of the leaks are likely coming from just 25 locations.

Although the buildup—or hotspot—of methane over the Southwest does not represent a health issue, methane is a well-documented contributor to global warming. It’s actually more of a contributor (between 25 and 86 times, according to different estimates) to the greenhouse effect than is the media’s favorite environmental nemesis, carbon dioxide.

The hotspot has been around since at least 2003, but until now, its source was not established. Now the scientific team used spectrometers from aboard a plane that flew over 1,200 square miles in the Southwest, the area where the biggest anomaly was detected earlier, explains lead study author Christian Frankenberg.

There is an ongoing debate currently in the U.S. about methane regulation, and the gas is inevitably found in oil and natural gas fields. The Environmental Protection Agency earlier this year stipulated that methane emissions from the oil and gas industry should be cut by more than 40 percent over the next 10 years, or by 510,000 short tons of the gas.

The agency pointed out in its report on the issue that methane is the second most prevalent greenhouse gas in the country from human activities and about a third of the total methane emissions come from the energy industry, including oil production and the extraction and transportation of natural gas.

By Irina Slav for Oilprice.com

More Top Reads From Oilprice.com:



Join the discussion | Back to homepage

Leave a comment

Leave a comment

Oilprice - The No. 1 Source for Oil & Energy News