• 3 minutes Could Venezuela become a net oil importer?
  • 7 minutes Reuters: OPEC Ministers Agree In Principle On 1 Million Barrels Per Day Nominal Output Increase
  • 12 minutes Battle for Oil Port: East Libya Forces In Full Control At Ras Lanuf
  • 13 hours Oil prices going Up? NO!
  • 3 mins Reuters: OPEC Ministers Agree In Principle On 1 Million Barrels Per Day Nominal Output Increase
  • 4 hours Renewables to generate 50% of worldwide electricity by 2050 (BNEF report)
  • 2 days Could Venezuela become a net oil importer?
  • 8 mins Kenya Eyes 200+ Oil Wells
  • 4 hours The Tony Seba report
  • 1 day Oil prices going down
  • 2 days Oil Buyers Club
  • 1 day Could oil demand collapse rapidly? Yup, sure could.
  • 9 hours Saudi Arabia turns to solar
  • 2 days Gazprom Exports to EU Hit Record
  • 20 hours China’s Plastic Waste Ban Will Leave 111 Million Tons of Trash With Nowhere To Go
  • 14 hours Are Electric Vehicles Really Better For The Environment?
  • 1 day Battle for Oil Port: East Libya Forces In Full Control At Ras Lanuf
  • 2 days Russia's Energy Minister says Oil Prices Balanced at $75, so Wants to Increase OPEC + Russia Oil by 1.5 mbpd
  • 1 day Tesla Closing a Dozen Solar Facilities in Nine States

Explaining the Relationship between Stimulus and Spending in Economic Growth

Let’s say that private gdp is 100 and government spending is 100.  Gdp then suddenly goes up to 200, so government spending as a percentage of gdp falls from 50% to 33.3%.  This is not a contractionary event.  It is fully possible to argue “government spending should go up too, to slot more public goods into the larger output,” but the initial change is expansionary, even though government spending as a percentage of gdp took a steep dive.

Let’s say that private gdp is 100 and government spending is 100.  Government spending stays the same in nominal terms but there is overall price inflation from a nominal change.  It is fully possible to argue “government spending should go up too, to restore the percentage of public goods in national output,” but the initial change is again expansionary in macroeconomic terms.  Nominal values are up.

In other words, when judging whether fiscal policy is contractionary or expansionary in macroeconomic terms, we do not automatically adjust for percentage of gdp and inflation.  Start instead by looking at nominal government spending, and then perhaps take a glance at nominal gdp or related measures.  The theory, after all, is about nominal values, most of all in the short run.

If you wish, I could construct a similar exercise for population or an increase in the labor force and come out with a similar result.

Click here to read the full article



Join the discussion | Back to homepage

Leave a comment

Leave a comment

Oilprice - The No. 1 Source for Oil & Energy News