• 5 hours India, China, U.S., Complain Of Venezuelan Crude Oil Quality Issues
  • 10 hours Kurdish Kirkuk-Ceyhan Crude Oil Flows Plunge To 225,000 Bpd
  • 14 hours Russia, Saudis Team Up To Boost Fracking Tech
  • 20 hours Conflicting News Spurs Doubt On Aramco IPO
  • 21 hours Exxon Starts Production At New Refinery In Texas
  • 22 hours Iraq Asks BP To Redevelop Kirkuk Oil Fields
  • 2 days Oil Prices Rise After U.S. API Reports Strong Crude Inventory Draw
  • 2 days Oil Gains Spur Growth In Canada’s Oil Cities
  • 2 days China To Take 5% Of Rosneft’s Output In New Deal
  • 2 days UAE Oil Giant Seeks Partnership For Possible IPO
  • 2 days Planting Trees Could Cut Emissions As Much As Quitting Oil
  • 2 days VW Fails To Secure Critical Commodity For EVs
  • 2 days Enbridge Pipeline Expansion Finally Approved
  • 2 days Iraqi Forces Seize Control Of North Oil Co Fields In Kirkuk
  • 2 days OPEC Oil Deal Compliance Falls To 86%
  • 3 days U.S. Oil Production To Increase in November As Rig Count Falls
  • 3 days Gazprom Neft Unhappy With OPEC-Russia Production Cut Deal
  • 3 days Disputed Venezuelan Vote Could Lead To More Sanctions, Clashes
  • 3 days EU Urges U.S. Congress To Protect Iran Nuclear Deal
  • 3 days Oil Rig Explosion In Louisiana Leaves 7 Injured, 1 Still Missing
  • 3 days Aramco Says No Plans To Shelve IPO
  • 5 days Trump Passes Iran Nuclear Deal Back to Congress
  • 6 days Texas Shutters More Coal-Fired Plants
  • 6 days Oil Trading Firm Expects Unprecedented U.S. Crude Exports
  • 6 days UK’s FCA Met With Aramco Prior To Proposing Listing Rule Change
  • 6 days Chevron Quits Australian Deepwater Oil Exploration
  • 6 days Europe Braces For End Of Iran Nuclear Deal
  • 6 days Renewable Energy Startup Powering Native American Protest Camp
  • 7 days Husky Energy Set To Restart Pipeline
  • 7 days Russia, Morocco Sign String Of Energy And Military Deals
  • 7 days Norway Looks To Cut Some Of Its Generous Tax Breaks For EVs
  • 7 days China Set To Continue Crude Oil Buying Spree, IEA Says
  • 7 days India Needs Help To Boost Oil Production
  • 7 days Shell Buys One Of Europe’s Largest EV Charging Networks
  • 7 days Oil Throwback: BP Is Bringing Back The Amoco Brand
  • 7 days Libyan Oil Output Covers 25% Of 2017 Budget Needs
  • 7 days District Judge Rules Dakota Access Can Continue Operating
  • 8 days Surprise Oil Inventory Build Shocks Markets
  • 8 days France’s Biggest Listed Bank To Stop Funding Shale, Oil Sands Projects
  • 8 days Syria’s Kurds Aim To Control Oil-Rich Areas
What’s Stopping An Oil Price Rally?

What’s Stopping An Oil Price Rally?

Oil prices rallied in Q3…

Is OPEC Considering Deeper Output Cuts?

Is OPEC Considering Deeper Output Cuts?

You could argue OPEC and…

Europe Hopes Algae Biofuel Grown in Seawater will Reduce Coal Consumption

Europe Hopes Algae Biofuel Grown in Seawater will Reduce Coal Consumption

In Europe’s quest for alternative energy sources to reduce its ever growing consumption of coal, a new EU research consortium, known as AccliPhot, has been created. Based at the University of Aberdeen it is researching the potential of using seawater as a source of biofuel.

The basic concept is not a new one. Sweater will be used to grow microalgae, which can then be converted into algae biofuel.

Traditional algae farming is highly water intensive meaning that water scarcity quickly becomes a problem. Using seawater clearly avoids this problem as it can be found in any coastal region in abundance.

Related article: Marginal Lands: Unfit for Food Crops, but Perfect for Biofuel Plants

The US has also spent time researching growing algae using seawater, and the California-based Aurora Biofuels has developed a large demonstration of growing algae in open saltwater ponds in Australia. Unfortunately this technique shifts the problem of water scarcity to one of land use issues as vast open ponds must be dug to grow the algae.

AccliPhot hopes to avoid this problem by cultivating the algae in bioreactors which resemble large vats and can be situated in any derelict industrial properties or unused land space.

Dr. Oliver Ebenhoeh, one of the researchers at the University of Aberdeen, stated that this new technique was generated due to the “need to find efficient ways of supplying our energy demand in a way that doesn’t compete for valuable resources like arable land or fresh water…Cultivating algae using water that can’t be used for irrigation, like salt water or brackish water, makes sense because it’s so vast – it’s all around us and there’s no competition to use the land to grow other things.”

By. Joao Peixe of Oilprice.com



Join the discussion | Back to homepage

Leave a comment
  • MR. SANJEEV SULE on March 22 2014 said:
    i wholeheartedly agree with you that salty, brackish, marine water or whatever you name it,should be used to produce algae as a bio fuel.Unlike fresh water it is abundant.The land around the salt water is not arable and does not suit agriculture.In fact in India one can see miles and miles of salt panes along its vast barren seacoast. Algae can not only produce fuel but it can be used as cattle feed to feed millions of hungry cattle. Salt water algae can prove to be a boon to the gas guzzling economy of India.
  • Paul Brunato on February 11 2013 said:
    It is great to see ongoing research into alternative energy sources. Please note that Aurora Biofuels changed its name to Aurora Algae 2010. The company’s outdoor algae cultivation leverages arid land and seawater, so it does not compete for arable land or fresh water.

Leave a comment

Oilprice - The No. 1 Source for Oil & Energy News