• 5 minutes Oil prices forecast
  • 8 minutes Nuclear Power Can Be Green – But At A Price
  • 11 minutes Projection Of Experts: Oil Prices Expected To Stay Anchored Around $65-70 Through 2023
  • 16 minutes Europe Slipping into Recession?
  • 4 mins *Happy Dance* ... U.S. Shale Oil Slowdown
  • 53 mins Socialists want to exorcise the O&G demon by 2030
  • 53 mins UK, Stay in EU, Says Tusk
  • 52 mins Germany: Russia Can Save INF If It Stops Violating The Treaty
  • 14 hours Emissions from wear of brakes and tyres likely to be higher in supposedly clean vehicles, experts warn
  • 2 days Connection Between Climate Rules And German's No-Limit Autobahns? Strange, But It Exists
  • 2 days Conspiracy - Theory versus Reality
  • 2 days Chevron to Boost Spend on Quick-Return Projects
  • 16 hours How Is Greenland Dealing With Climate Change?
  • 2 days Maritime Act of 2020 and pending carbon tax effects
  • 3 days U.S. Treasury Secretary Mnuchin Weighs Lifting Tariffs On China
  • 29 mins Saudi Private Jet Industry Stalls After Corruption Crackdown
Oil May Never Return To The Triple-Digits

Oil May Never Return To The Triple-Digits

Fewer and fewer energy professionals…

Engineers to Build House Entirely from Waste

Many projects which push the bounds of traditional thinking and ways of doing things are often not about the acceptance of the actual project as a whole, but the development of new technologies used in the overall project. That is precisely the point with a recent venture in which a team of UK engineers will build a house entirely from waste, using materials such as old toothbrushes, cut-up jeans, video cassettes, and mattress filling.

The idea is very similar to a prototype building that Kevin McCloud, the presenter of Channel 4 series Grand Designs, created during a 2010 exhibition in London, and has actually been named “The House that Kevin Built.”

The House that Kevin Built
The House that Kevin Built

Related Article: Do EVs Make Good Cents or Sense?

This £300,000 project will be larger and created as a much more permanent structure. It has been in the pipeline for around four year, and construction finally began in November 2012 on a site donated by the University of Brighton.

Jon Lee, from the Ecology Building Society, recognises the originality of the idea and the potential for the discovery of new, cheap, recycled materials that can be used in the construction industry. “It’s a leap forward in highlighting the effectiveness of such materials.”

The building will have a wooden frame created from leftovers and cut offs from other construction sites. Other waste materials such as cassettes, plastic bottles, ripped jeans, etc. will be used to fill the cavity between the internal and external walls.

By. Joao Peixe of Oilprice.com



Join the discussion | Back to homepage

Leave a comment

Leave a comment

Oilprice - The No. 1 Source for Oil & Energy News